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1.
Figure 5

Figure 5. From: Regulating Medicines in Croatia: Five-year Experience of Agency for Medicinal Products and Medical Devices.

Number of medical devices registered in the Medical Devices Register of the Agency for Medicinal Products and Medical Devices, Croatia, in the period 2004-2008

Siniša Tomić, et al. Croat Med J. 2010 April;51(2):104-112.
3.
Figure 2

Figure 2. From: Regulating Medicines in Croatia: Five-year Experience of Agency for Medicinal Products and Medical Devices.

Agency for Medicinal Products and Medical Devices, Croatia, in the period 2004-2008: regular medicinal product quality control reports of every imported batch in Croatia.

Siniša Tomić, et al. Croat Med J. 2010 April;51(2):104-112.
4.
Figure 4

Figure 4. From: Regulating Medicines in Croatia: Five-year Experience of Agency for Medicinal Products and Medical Devices.

Number of spontaneous adverse reactions reported to the Croatian Agency for Medicinal Products and Medical Devices in the period from 2005-2008. Striped bars – number of spontaneous adverse reactions reported for medicinal products; gray bars – number of spontaneous adverse reactions reported for vaccines.

Siniša Tomić, et al. Croat Med J. 2010 April;51(2):104-112.
5.
Figure 3

Figure 3. From: Regulating Medicines in Croatia: Five-year Experience of Agency for Medicinal Products and Medical Devices.

Agency for Medicinal Products and Medical Devices, Croatia, in the period 2004-2008: deficiencies of medicinal products. Gray bars – non-compliance in labeling and patient information leaflet; striped bars – substantial quality defects.

Siniša Tomić, et al. Croat Med J. 2010 April;51(2):104-112.
6.
Figure 1

Figure 1. From: Regulating Medicines in Croatia: Five-year Experience of Agency for Medicinal Products and Medical Devices.

Medicinal product quality control reports issued by the Agency for Medicinal Products and Medical Devices, Croatia, in the period 2004-2008. Gray bars – special quality control of the first batch; closed bars – off-shelf quality control.

Siniša Tomić, et al. Croat Med J. 2010 April;51(2):104-112.
7.
Figure 1

Figure 1. From: Nanomaterials and synergistic low intensity direct current (LIDC) stimulation technology for orthopaedic implantable medical devices.

This chart shows the projection of the 2015 US Market (in USD) and examples of implantable medical devices7. Orthopaedic implantable medical devices have the most significant market share (56%). Nanomaterials and synergistic engineering technologies have the potential to impact the unmet needs and shortcomings in this market.

Rohan A. Shirwaiker, et al. Wiley Interdiscip Rev Nanomed Nanobiotechnol. 2013 May;5(3):191-204.
8.
Figure 2

Figure 2. From: Adhoc electromagnetic compatibility testing of non-implantable medical devices and radio frequency identification.

Percentage of medical devices experiencing EMI for each device category at different RFID frequency ranges. LF = 134 kHz, HF = 13.56 MHz, UHF = 915 MHz. No EMI was observed at 433 MHz or 2.45 GHz. No EMI was observed for the one a ventilator tested.

Seth J Seidman, et al. Biomed Eng Online. 2013;12:71-71.
9.

Figure. From: SeeClear(TM) MAX Laparoscopic Smoke Evacuation System.

SeeClear™ MAX Laparoscopic Smoke Evacuation System (JLJ Medical Devices International, LLC, Eden Prairie, MN). Photo courtesy of JLJ Medical Devices International, LLC.

James A Greenberg. Rev Obstet Gynecol. 2008 Winter;1(1):38-39.
10.
Figure 1

Figure 1. From: Security and Interoperable Medical Device Systems: Part 1.

A simplified generic architecture for interoperable medical devices. The coordinator connects a group of medical devices via a shared network. The alarm system generates alarms for both medical and functional problems.

Krishna K. Venkatasubramanian, et al. IEEE Secur Priv. 2012 September-October;10(5):61-63.
11.
Figure 3

Figure 3. From: Silver Nanoparticles and Mitochondrial Interaction.

TEM images of AgNps (red arrows) in cytoplasmatic space of fibroblast present in a healed skin sample treated with AgNP based medical devices. The diameter of particles released from the medical devices are of 20 nm, indicating that their aggregates are able to enter the cells by endocytosis.

Eriberto Bressan, et al. Int J Dent. 2013;2013:312747.
12.
Figure 1

Figure 1. From: Cytology of the vulva: feasibility and preliminary results of a new brush.

Vulva brush (Rovers Medical Devices BV).

L C G van den Einden, et al. Br J Cancer. 2012 January 17;106(2):269-273.
13.
Figure 7

Figure 7. From: DNA nanotechnology: a future perspective.

DNA uncoiling and forming precise patterns, a prelude to biologically based electronics and medical devices [61].

Muniza Zahid, et al. Nanoscale Res Lett. 2013;8(1):119-119.
14.
Figure 3

Figure 3. From: Medical device design for adolescent adherence and developmental goals: a case study of a cystic fibrosis physiotherapy device.

Medical devices as facilitators for achievement of adolescent goals and adherence.

Alexandra R Lang, et al. Patient Prefer Adherence. 2014;8:301-309.
15.
Figure 17

Figure 17. From: The optimal optical readout for the x-ray light valve--Document scanners.

The MTF of the scanner is plotted with MTFs of medical devices and shown to exceed devices currently available for both radiography and mammography.

P. Oakham, et al. Med Phys. 2008 December;35(12):5672-5683.
16.
Figure 1

Figure 1. From: Doctors told to shun rewards from industry as size of payments becomes clear.

Whistleblower Jacqueline Poteet, a former employee of medical devices firm Medtronic, has accused it of giving bribes to surgeons
Credit: KATE MEDLEY

Fred Charatan. BMJ. 2006 February 4;332(7536):255-255.
17.

Figure. From: The ethics of reusing single-use devices.

The US health care sector follows only the food industry in contributing to landfills. Reprocessing single-use medical devices could reduce medical waste.

Roger Collier. CMAJ. 2011 August 9;183(11):1245-1245.
18.

Figure 2. From: Ensuring Safety in the Operating Room - The "Fundamental Use of Surgical Energy" (FUSE) Program.

Page examples of the FUSE manual, chapter “Integration of Energy Systems With Other Medical Devices” (24)

Pascal Fuchshuber, et al. Int Anesthesiol Clin. 2013 Fall;51(4):65-80.
19.
Figure 1

Figure 1. From: Assessment of the knowledge of graphical symbols labelled on malaria rapid diagnostic tests in four international settings.

International standard regulations that provide guidelines on the use of symbols on IVDs and medical devices.

Veerle Hermans, et al. Malar J. 2011;10:331-331.
20.
Fig. 1

Fig. 1. From: Introduction: Feature Issue on Phantoms for the Performance Evaluation and Validation of Optical Medical Imaging Devices.

Translational research map of medical devices from the basic research state to practical application in clinical settings.

Jeeseong Hwang, et al. Biomed Opt Express. 2012 June 1;3(6):1399-1403.

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