We are sorry, but NCBI web applications do not support your browser and may not function properly. More information

Results: 3

1.
Figure 3

Figure 3. From: Too hard to control: compromised pain anticipation and modulation in mild traumatic brain injury.

Schematic of the effects of brain injury on pain modulatory system based on the observed moderation functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) results. Scatter plots representing significant moderation effects of brain injury on the relationship between anticipatory PAG activation and subjective pain. The healthy control (HC) group demonstrated significant negative relationship between anticipatory periaqueductal grey (PAG) activation and the reported pain intensity rating (ρ=−0.747; P<0.01) (green). This was not observed in the mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) group (ρ=0.218; P=0.4) (orange). PSC, percent signal change.

I A Strigo, et al. Transl Psychiatry. 2014 January;4(1):e340.
2.
Figure 2

Figure 2. From: Too hard to control: compromised pain anticipation and modulation in mild traumatic brain injury.

Whole brain activation during pain experience. (a) Significant whole brain activation during high versus low-pain stimulation in both groups (see Table 2 bottom for details). Both groups show significantly increased activation within bilateral insulas, rostral and dorsal anterior cingulate, right postcentral gyrus, basal ganglia and the cerebellum. Bar graphs indicate percent signal changes (PSC) and show that activation within these regions was comparable between the two groups. Right=left. (b) Significant between-group differences in the whole brain activation during pain experience (see Table 2 bottom for details). Mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) relative to healthy control (HC) subjects show increased activation within right dorsolateral prefrontal (dlPFC), left middle temporal gyrus and left precuneus. No decreased activation in MTBI relative to HC was observed. Bar graphs indicate PSC in right dlPFC. Right=left. *P<0.05. rdpINS, right dorso-posterior insula; lINS, left insula; rACC, right anterior cingulate; rINS, right insula.

I A Strigo, et al. Transl Psychiatry. 2014 January;4(1):e340.
3.
Figure 1

Figure 1. From: Too hard to control: compromised pain anticipation and modulation in mild traumatic brain injury.

Whole brain activation during pain anticipation. (a) Significant whole brain activation during high versus low-pain anticipation in both groups (see Table 2 top for details). Both groups show significantly increased activation within bilateral anterior insulas, several regions within the prefrontal cortex, bilateral middle temporal gyri, posterior parietal lobule, right inferior occipital gyrus, right parahippocampal gyrus and the midbrain. Bar graphs indicate percent signal changes (PSC) and show that activation within these regions was comparable between the two groups. Right=left. (b) Significant between-group differences in whole brain activation during pain anticipation (see Table 2 top for details). Mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) relative to healthy control (HC) subjects show increased activation within midbrain periaqueductal grey (PAG), the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC), left cuneus. No decreased activation in MTBI relative to HC was observed. Bar graphs indicate PSC in right dlPFC (top) and PAG (bottom) during anticipation period (indicated by the boarder) and during pain period for comparison. Right=left. *P<0.05; ***P<0.001. LAI, left anterior insula; PPL, posterior parietal lobule; RAI, right anterior insula; vmPFC, ventromedial prefrontal cortex.

I A Strigo, et al. Transl Psychiatry. 2014 January;4(1):e340.

Supplemental Content

Recent activity

Your browsing activity is empty.

Activity recording is turned off.

Turn recording back on

See more...
Write to the Help Desk