Results: 4

1.
Figure 1

Figure 1. Phylum- and species-level diversity.. From: The Microbiome of the Middle Meatus in Healthy Adults .

(A) Phylum-level classification for each subject demonstrates community diversity, but also variability between subjects. Only phyla with median relative abundances greater than 0.5% are shown. (B) Species-level analysis with a minimum 0.5% abundance demonstrates diversity and variability between subjects.

Vijay R. Ramakrishnan, et al. PLoS One. 2013;8(12):e85507.
2.
Figure 2

Figure 2. Correlation between relative abundances of Corynebacteria and Lactobacilli.. From: The Microbiome of the Middle Meatus in Healthy Adults .

16S rRNA sequence abundances of Lactobacillus spp. and (A) Corynebacterium tuberculostearicum and (B) Corynebacterium spp. X- and Y-axes represent the percent abundances of the specified OTUs, normalized to total sequence counts. Each circle represents a study participant.

Vijay R. Ramakrishnan, et al. PLoS One. 2013;8(12):e85507.
3.
Figure 3

Figure 3. Age-associated differences in the healthy microbiome.. From: The Microbiome of the Middle Meatus in Healthy Adults .

Differences in the phylum-level (panel A) and species-level (panel B) percent relative abundances of 16S rRNA sequences between subjects categorized by age (over or under 50 years of age) are shown. Only taxa with percent relative abundances greater than 0.5% are included; the abundant species are normalized to 100% in order to better depict between-group differences. Multivariate analyses of microbiome datasets revealed significant differences at both the phylum-level (*: p = 0.03) and species-level (**: p = 0.004).

Vijay R. Ramakrishnan, et al. PLoS One. 2013;8(12):e85507.
4.
Figure 4

Figure 4. Effects of smoking on the healthy microbiome.. From: The Microbiome of the Middle Meatus in Healthy Adults .

Differences in the species-level (panel A) percent relative abundances of 16S rRNA sequences between subjects categorized by history of smoking are shown. Only taxa with percent relative abundances greater than 0.5% are included; the abundant species are normalized to 100% in order to better depict between-group differences. Although multivariate analyses of microbiome datasets did not reveal a significant association between smoking and microbiome composition (p = 0.15), select taxa differed significantly in percent relative abundance between smoking categories (panel B).

Vijay R. Ramakrishnan, et al. PLoS One. 2013;8(12):e85507.

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