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1.
Figure 2

Figure 2. From: Superimposed traumatic brain injury modulates vasomotor responses in third-order vessels after hemorrhagic shock.

Experimental protocol and flow of experiments.

Bo Chen, et al. Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2013;21:77-77.
2.
Figure 4

Figure 4. From: Superimposed traumatic brain injury modulates vasomotor responses in third-order vessels after hemorrhagic shock.

Vasomotor responses to hemorrhagic shock with and without superimposed TBI by change in arteriolar (A) and venular (B) diameters for the five observation time points. (* p < 0.05; ** p < 0.01; # p < 0.05).

Bo Chen, et al. Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2013;21:77-77.
3.
Figure 5

Figure 5. From: Superimposed traumatic brain injury modulates vasomotor responses in third-order vessels after hemorrhagic shock.

Pictorial example of arteriolar diameter change in response to hemorrhagic shock only (upper panel) and when combined with superimposed TBI (lower panel) at baseline and at 60 minutes of shock.

Bo Chen, et al. Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2013;21:77-77.
4.
Figure 3

Figure 3. From: Superimposed traumatic brain injury modulates vasomotor responses in third-order vessels after hemorrhagic shock.

Mean arterial blood pressure (mmHg) during the experiment for the three groups: Sham, hemorrhagic shock (HS) and HS with traumatic brain injury (TBI).

Bo Chen, et al. Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2013;21:77-77.
5.
Figure 7

Figure 7. From: Superimposed traumatic brain injury modulates vasomotor responses in third-order vessels after hemorrhagic shock.

Blood flow for the three experimental groups and the five observation time points. The upper panel (A) shows arteriolar blood flow and the lower panel (B) shows venular blood flow. (* p < 0.05; ** p < 0.01; # p < 0.05)

Bo Chen, et al. Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2013;21:77-77.
6.
Figure 6

Figure 6. From: Superimposed traumatic brain injury modulates vasomotor responses in third-order vessels after hemorrhagic shock.

Red blood cell (RBC) velocity for the three experimental groups and the five observation time points. The upper panel (A) shows arteriolar RBC velocity and the lower panel (B) shows venular RBC velocity. (* p < 0.05; ** p < 0.01; # p < 0.05)

Bo Chen, et al. Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2013;21:77-77.
7.
Figure 1

Figure 1. From: Superimposed traumatic brain injury modulates vasomotor responses in third-order vessels after hemorrhagic shock.

Traumatic brain injury via lateral fluid-percussion (LFP). The lesion inflicted via LFP is typically located between Bregma −2,3 mm and −7,3 mm (i.). Injured regions include the ipsilateral cortex (c) but also deeper brain/brain stem structures such as hippocampal (hc), thalamic, hypothalamic (ht), pontine, and supraoptic areas (spoa) (ii.; coronar section of the brain at Bregma −4,52; arrow indicates direction of impact). The model used for this experiment reproducible creates a subdural haematoma (iii.), focal cortical contusion ipsilateral to the injured site of the brain with a characteristic pattern of haemorrhage involving subcortical white matter, adjunct cortex, subarachnoid space, hippocampus as well as deep brain structures such as thalamus, hypothalamus and pontine regions (iv.; Nissl staining), and a mass shift towards the contralateral hemisphere as a consequence of the trauma-induced ipsilateral cytotoxic/vasogenic edema (v.; T-2-weighted MRI). (modified from [31]; see also “The Rat Brain in Stereotaxic Coordinates” by Praxinos and Watson; Academic Press, 1998).

Bo Chen, et al. Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2013;21:77-77.

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