Results: 5

1.
Figure 3

Figure 3. From: Internal pressure of human meniscal root attachments during loading.

Representative pressure-time histories at 0° of knee flexion.

Adam C. Abraham, et al. J Orthop Res. ;31(10):1507-1513.
2.
Figure 2

Figure 2. From: Internal pressure of human meniscal root attachments during loading.

Schematic of sensor placement within each root attachment site. A 21.5 gauge needle was inserted adjacent to the meniscal horn, in the middle of the root attachment. The sensor was inserted into the needle and implanted into the tissue and then the needle was retracted from the joint during testing.

Adam C. Abraham, et al. J Orthop Res. ;31(10):1507-1513.
3.
Figure 1

Figure 1. From: Internal pressure of human meniscal root attachments during loading.

Schematic of joint loading apparatus and relative flexion angles used for testing. The tibiofemoral joint was positioned using freely rotating fixturing, then the position of the tibia was fixed, next a preload was applied to the quadriceps using an electric actuator, and lastly the load is applied to the femur.

Adam C. Abraham, et al. J Orthop Res. ;31(10):1507-1513.
4.
Figure 4

Figure 4. From: Internal pressure of human meniscal root attachments during loading.

Bubble charts showing the relative amount and change in fluid pressure for each root attachment site at each tested angle of flexion (Black circles - ramp pressure, gray circles - equilibrium pressure). Relative bubble locations are shown to correct anatomical scale (axes in millimeters, mean data from 39). Medial posterior root attachment maintains the greatest amount of pressure.

Adam C. Abraham, et al. J Orthop Res. ;31(10):1507-1513.
5.
Figure 5

Figure 5. From: Internal pressure of human meniscal root attachments during loading.

Relative change in ramp and equilibrium pressure for each meniscal root attachment site over a range of flexion angles and joint conditions. Average pressure was greatest at 0° of flexion. The medial posterior root attachment sustained the greatest amount of pressure. Transection of the ACL resulted in a decrease in pressure in the LA and an increase in the MP for ramp and equilibrium pressures, respectively. Longitudinal lesion of the LP did not further alter pressure.^ - sig. diff than 0°, # - sig. diff. than MP, * - sig. diff than healthy (p < 0.05).

Adam C. Abraham, et al. J Orthop Res. ;31(10):1507-1513.

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