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Results: 4

1.
Figure 1.

Figure 1. From: Quantitative Phase Imaging Techniques for the Study of Cell Pathophysiology: From Principles to Applications.

Principles of QPI (A) Conventional bright-field imaging measures amplitude information only; (B) QPI employs the principle of interferometry or holography, and measures both amplitude and phase information.

KyeoReh Lee, et al. Sensors (Basel). 2013 April;13(4):4170-4191.
2.
Figure 4.

Figure 4. From: Quantitative Phase Imaging Techniques for the Study of Cell Pathophysiology: From Principles to Applications.

The study of cell pathology using QPI (A) Cross-sectional images of 3-D RI tomograms of Pf-RBCs measured by TPM. Black arrows: parasitophorous vacuole; gray arrows: hemozoin; (B) Topograms of RBCs from a SCD patient, measured by DPM. II-IV: classification based on morphology; (C) morphology of rat basophilic leukemia RBL-2H3 cells infected with V. vulnificus strains; (D) Phase image of high-definition-CTC measured by non-interferometric quantitative phase microscopy. (AD) are modified from refs. [78,112,127], and [132], respectively, with permissions.

KyeoReh Lee, et al. Sensors (Basel). 2013 April;13(4):4170-4191.
3.
Figure 2.

Figure 2. From: Quantitative Phase Imaging Techniques for the Study of Cell Pathophysiology: From Principles to Applications.

Experimental setups for typical QPI techniques. (A) Michelson interferometric microscopy; (B) Digital holographic microscopy, spatial-domain Mach-Zehnder interferometry; (C) Diffraction phase microscopy, spatial-domain common-path interferometry; (D) Time-domain Mach-Zehnder interferometric microscopy; (E) Tomographic phase microscopy, time-domain Mach-Zehnder type. The angle of illumination is controlled by a galvano-mirror (GM). AOM: acousto-optics modulator; SF: spatial filter; S: sample; OBJ: objective lens; BS: beam splitter; G; grating. (AE) are modified from References [8, 9, 10 and 11], and [12], respectively, with permissions.

KyeoReh Lee, et al. Sensors (Basel). 2013 April;13(4):4170-4191.
4.
Figure 3.

Figure 3. From: Quantitative Phase Imaging Techniques for the Study of Cell Pathophysiology: From Principles to Applications.

The study of cell physiology using QPI (A) Topography of a human red blood cell or erythrocyte measured by DPM; (B) A hippocampal neuron measured by SLIM; (C) 3D rendering of RI tomogram of a HT28 cell measured by TPM; (D) The growth of E. coli as a function of time measured by SLIM. Colored circles: growth curves for each cell; inset: single cell dry mass density at the indicated time points (in minutes) (Scale bar: 2 μm); histogram: the dry mass noise associated with the background (SD σ = 1.9 fg); blue line: a fixed cell; (E) Dynamic membrane fluctuations of human RBCs at various osmotic pressures. Blue area; physiological range of osmotic pressure. (AE) are modified from Reference [79,18,12,82] and [83] respectively, with permissions.

KyeoReh Lee, et al. Sensors (Basel). 2013 April;13(4):4170-4191.

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