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1.
Figure 2

Figure 2. Comparison between ML ratios measured at different cross-sectional surveys.. From: The Ratio of Monocytes to Lymphocytes in Peripheral Blood Correlates with Increased Susceptibility to Clinical Malaria in Kenyan Children.

Spearman rank correlation coefficient is used to assess the relationship between ML ratios across different surveys according to parasite positive/negative status at the time the ML ratio was measured. Results are shown for children that were parasite positive at the May 2007 or 2008 or 2009 or 2010 survey and parasite positive (A) or parasite negative (B) in subsequent surveys (that is 2008–2011). In (C) and (D) results are shown for children that were parasite negative at the May 2007 or 2008 or 2009 or 2010 survey and parasite positive (C) or parasite negative (D) in subsequent surveys (that is 2008–2011). Rho values from all comparisons are shown and statistically significant comparisons (P<0.05) indicated in shaded boxes. Unshaded boxes represent comparisons that showed no significant correlation.

George M. Warimwe, et al. PLoS One. 2013;8(2):e57320.
2.
Figure 1

Figure 1. ML ratio positively correlates with risk of clinical malaria.. From: The Ratio of Monocytes to Lymphocytes in Peripheral Blood Correlates with Increased Susceptibility to Clinical Malaria in Kenyan Children.

Kaplan-Meier plots of the relationship between ML ratio and time to first episode of clinical malaria during follow-up is shown. (A) and (B) represent results using ML ratios measured in the May 2008 baseline survey and consider a follow-up period ending on 31st December 2011. However, most parasite positive children had experienced their first clinical malaria episode within a year since sampling in the May 2008 baseline survey and so the plots show data for the first 12 months of follow-up. (C) and (D) represent results based on ML ratios measured at each of five surveys (May 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010 and 2011) and consider time to the first episode within the respective one year inter-survey periods as the primary endpoint. The hazard ratios (HR) from unadjusted Cox regression models using ML ratio as the only explanatory variable are shown. The cumulative proportion of children with malaria in relation to their ML ratio, stratified into three arbitrary groups, is shown. “High ML ratio” and “Low ML ratio” represent children whose ML ratio falls in the top and bottom 25th percentile of the sampled population, respectively, whilst “Medium ML ratio” represents all other children.

George M. Warimwe, et al. PLoS One. 2013;8(2):e57320.

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