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Results: 9

1.
Figure 5

Figure 5. The integrated catheter-plunger system. From: Radially branched deployment for more efficient cell transplantation at the scale of the human brain.

Advancing the plunger wire within the bore of the catheter delivers precise volumes of cells through the distal ports.

Matthew T. Silvestrini, et al. Stereotact Funct Neurosurg. ;91(2):92-103.
2.
Figure 7

Figure 7. Evaluation of infusion reflux. From: Radially branched deployment for more efficient cell transplantation at the scale of the human brain.

Distribution of Allura Red AC dye in agarose gel after delivery through the RBD prototype (A–C) or the 20G cannula-syringe system (D–F).

Matthew T. Silvestrini, et al. Stereotact Funct Neurosurg. ;91(2):92-103.
3.
Figure 9

Figure 9. Schematic illustrating the use of RBD to deliver cells to a larger human brain target. From: Radially branched deployment for more efficient cell transplantation at the scale of the human brain.

By deploying the catheter at multiple rotational angles and depths, transplantation to larger target regions, such as the putamen (pink), can be achieved with a single transcortical brain penetration.

Matthew T. Silvestrini, et al. Stereotact Funct Neurosurg. ;91(2):92-103.
4.
Figure 6

Figure 6. NPC differentiation after transit through the RBD cell delivery catheter. From: Radially branched deployment for more efficient cell transplantation at the scale of the human brain.

(A,C,E) Differentiation of NPCs that did not transit the device (control). (B,D,F) Differentiation of NPCs that were dispensed through the RBD catheter-plunger system. (A,B) GFAP (red), astrocyte marker. (C,D) Tuj1 (green), neuronal marker. (E,F) O4 (green) oligodendrocyte marker.

Matthew T. Silvestrini, et al. Stereotact Funct Neurosurg. ;91(2):92-103.
5.
Figure 8

Figure 8. Use of the RBD prototype with the Clearpoint SMARTframe for delivery to the swine brain. From: Radially branched deployment for more efficient cell transplantation at the scale of the human brain.

(A–D) Distribution of fluorescent beads after delivery with the RBD prototype. Arrows in (A) and (C) indicate the locations of radial delivery paths, and (B) and (D) show corresponding higher power fluorescent images of the deposited beads (green).

Matthew T. Silvestrini, et al. Stereotact Funct Neurosurg. ;91(2):92-103.
6.
Figure 1

Figure 1. Components of the radially branched deployment (RBD) prototype. From: Radially branched deployment for more efficient cell transplantation at the scale of the human brain.

(A) outer guide tube, (B) inner guide tube, (C) cell delivery catheter, (D) plunger wire. These separated RBD components assemble in a nested manner.

Matthew T. Silvestrini, et al. Stereotact Funct Neurosurg. ;91(2):92-103.
7.
Figure 2

Figure 2. Open and closed configurations of the outer guide tube side port. From: Radially branched deployment for more efficient cell transplantation at the scale of the human brain.

The side port can be opened (D) or closed (B) by the user through rotation (c, curved arrow) and linear translation (b or d, straight arrows) of the inner guide tube via manipulation of the proximal inner guide tube controls (A).

Matthew T. Silvestrini, et al. Stereotact Funct Neurosurg. ;91(2):92-103.
8.
Figure 3

Figure 3. Control and safety elements of the RBD prototype. From: Radially branched deployment for more efficient cell transplantation at the scale of the human brain.

The RBD prototype is shown here integrated with the Clearpoint SMARTframe. (A) Plunger lock. This torquer at the catheter proximal end controls movement of the plunger wire. (B) Catheter lock. This Touhy borst adaptor provides a gas tight seal at the most proximal end and must be opened to allow linear translation of the catheter within the inner guide tube. (C) Side port lock. With this Touhy bost adaptor, the RBD prototype can be locked in either the open or closed configurations. (D). Depth stop. This stop collar, affixed to the SMARTframe, controls the depth and rotation of RBD outer guide tube.

Matthew T. Silvestrini, et al. Stereotact Funct Neurosurg. ;91(2):92-103.
9.
Figure 4

Figure 4. Radial catheter deployment. From: Radially branched deployment for more efficient cell transplantation at the scale of the human brain.

(A–B) As the user advances the catheter through the catheter lock at the proximal end, the catheter emerges from the side port along a radially-oriented path. (C–G) Sequential images taken of catheter deployment overlaid upon an image of the actual final deployed position. The tip of the catheter is dyed blue, to allow easier visualization. (H) Four examples of the variable distances and catheter paths that can be attained with RBD. The same RBD guide tube assembly was used to deploy four different catheters, each with a unique radius of curvature. The final position of each catheter was photographed and merged into a single image. (I) Example of multiple catheter deployments branched from a single cannula trajectory. The final position of six catheter deployments, each performed at a different rotational angle and depth, was photographed and merged, demonstrating the resulting “tree-like” pattern of deployment.

Matthew T. Silvestrini, et al. Stereotact Funct Neurosurg. ;91(2):92-103.

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