Results: 2

1.
Figure 1

Figure 1. Changes in Rates of Death from Lung Cancer and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) over Time among Current Female and Male Smokers in the Three Time Periods. From: 50-Year Trends in Smoking-Related Mortality in the United States.

Data were obtained from the first Cancer Prevention Study (CPS I) for the period from 1959 to 1965, from the second Cancer Prevention Study (CPS II) for the period from 1982 to 1988, and from five contemporary cohort studies for the period from 2000 to 2010.

Michael J. Thun, et al. N Engl J Med. 2013 January 24;368(4):351-364.
2.
Figure 2

Figure 2. Relative Risks of Lung Cancer and COPD among Current Smokers, According to Number of Cigarettes Smoked per Day, and among Former Smokers, According to Age at the Time of Quitting, in the Contemporary Cohorts. From: 50-Year Trends in Smoking-Related Mortality in the United States.

Pooled Cox proportional-hazards, multivariable models were used to determine relative risks for current or former smokers who participated in the Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition cohort, the Health Professionals Follow-up Study, the Nurses’ Health Study, the National Institutes of Health–American Association of Retired Persons Diet and Health Study (NIH–AARP), and the Women’s Health Initiative study, 2000–2010. All models were controlled for education level, race, and cohort and were stratified according to the participant’s age in 2000. Data were not available for age at the time of quitting for former smokers in the NIH–AARP study. Former smokers who had quit more than 2 years before the survey date were included. P<0.001 for the test for trend. Vertical lines indicate 95% confidence intervals.

Michael J. Thun, et al. N Engl J Med. 2013 January 24;368(4):351-364.

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