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Results: 4

1.
Figure 2

Figure 2. From: The relationship between the localization of the generalized spike and wave discharge generators and the response to valproate.

Slices from the anatomic regions of interest (ROIs) used in Figs 3 and 4 are overlayed on the standard MNI anatomic brain In radiologic orientation. Regions were obtained from the Harvard-Oxford cortical and subcortical probabilistic atlases distributed with FSL Voxels with probability >50% of residing within the anatomic region are shown and were used as a mask to compute the ROI time courses in Figures 3 and 4.
Epilepsia © ILAE

Jerzy P. Szaflarski, et al. Epilepsia. ;54(3):471-480.
2.
Figure 3

Figure 3. From: The relationship between the localization of the generalized spike and wave discharge generators and the response to valproate.

Spike-related fMRI activation was computed at the goup level for all subjects. The average and standard deviation of positive t-values within four regions of interest (ROIs, refer to Fig 2) are shown. spike times obtained from a simultaneous EEG recording were convolved with a canonical gamma variate hemodynamic response function (HRF) with its peak 4.7 s post onset using ARNI. T-maps were produced with HRF onset aligned with spikes (0 s), before spikes (−1,−2, … s), and after spikes(+1,+2, … s).
Epilepsia © ILAE

Jerzy P. Szaflarski, et al. Epilepsia. ;54(3):471-480.
3.
Figure 4

Figure 4. From: The relationship between the localization of the generalized spike and wave discharge generators and the response to valproate.

A group level contrast for spike-related fMRI activation in valproate (VPA)-resistant versus VPA-responsive subjects was performed. The average and standard deviation of positive t-values within four regions of interest (ROIs, refer to Fig 2) are shown. Spike times obtained from a simultaneous EEG recording were convolved with a canonical gamma variate hemodynamic response function (HRF) with its peak 4.7 s post onset using AFNI. T-maps were produced with HRF onset aligned with spikes (0 s), before spikes (−1, −2, … s), and after spikes (+1,+2, … s).
Epilepsia © ILAE

Jerzy P. Szaflarski, et al. Epilepsia. ;54(3):471-480.
4.
Figure 1

Figure 1. From: The relationship between the localization of the generalized spike and wave discharge generators and the response to valproate.

Spike-related activation (red) and deactivation (blue), controlling for number of spikes, are overlayed on the standard MNI anatomic brain in radiologic orientation. Spike times obtained from a simultaneous EEG recording were convolved with a canonical gamma variate hemodynamic response function (HRF)with its peak 4.7 s post onset using AFNI. Activation maps were produced with HRF onset aligied with spikes (0 s), before spikes (−1,−2, … s), and after spikes (+1,+2, … s). Group responses from all subjects (left) and a contrast between vdproate (VPA)-resistant and VPA-responsive subjects(right) were obtained. Significant (a < 0.05) clusters of >36 suprathreshold voxels (left: two-sided t > 2.3, right: one-sided t > 2) are shown.
Epilepsia © ILAE

Jerzy P. Szaflarski, et al. Epilepsia. ;54(3):471-480.

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