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Results: 6

1.
Figure 3

Figure 3. From: In Vivo Biochemistry in Bacterial Cells Using FRAP: Insight into the Translation Cycle.

Ribosomal 50S dynamics in untreated cells. (A) Experimental kymograph showing the averaged postbleaching fluorescence signal dynamics measured for 21 untreated CJW3821 cells producing GFP-labeled 50S subunits. (B) Simulated best-fit kymograph when FB is fixed at 0.70 (DB, DF, and kR+B being optimized). (C) Residuals of the fit.

Paula Montero Llopis, et al. Biophys J. 2012 November 7;103(9):1848-1859.
2.
Figure 5

Figure 5. From: In Vivo Biochemistry in Bacterial Cells Using FRAP: Insight into the Translation Cycle.

Analysis of the FRAP data using a three-component model. (A) Schematic representation of the three-component diffusion model for DNP-treated cells. (B) Experimental data for DNP-treated cells (same as Fig. 2D) and a fit with the fixed kR+B1+B2 and DF values. (C) Schematic representation of the three-component diffusion model for untreated cells. (D) Experimental data for untreated cells (same as Fig. 3A) and a fit with the fixed DF value. (E) Experimental data for DNP-treated cells (same as Fig. 2D) and a fit with the fixed kR+B1+B2 value. (F) Experimental data for untreated cells (same as Fig. 3A) and a fit with fixed FB1 and FB2 values.

Paula Montero Llopis, et al. Biophys J. 2012 November 7;103(9):1848-1859.
3.
Figure 1

Figure 1. From: In Vivo Biochemistry in Bacterial Cells Using FRAP: Insight into the Translation Cycle.

FRAP analysis of GFP diffusion. (A) Schematic representation of the single-component diffusion model used for the analysis of GFP fluorescence dynamics. (B) Fluorescence micrographs of a representative FtsZ-depleted CJW4005 cell showing the dynamics of the GFP fluorescence signal in the cell after photobleaching. Selected images of the time-lapse sequence and a schematic representation of the process are shown. (C) Kymograph showing postbleaching fluorescence dynamics in the cell shown in (B). (D) Best-fit kymograph. (E) Residuals (errors) of the fit. Note that the scale of the heat map for the residuals is 10 times smaller than the scale for the kymograph in (C) and (D). (F) Distribution of DGFP values for all 31 cells analyzed.

Paula Montero Llopis, et al. Biophys J. 2012 November 7;103(9):1848-1859.
4.
Figure 2

Figure 2. From: In Vivo Biochemistry in Bacterial Cells Using FRAP: Insight into the Translation Cycle.

In situ estimation of the fraction of bound ribosomes (FB) in energy-depleted (DNP-treated) cells. (A) Schematics of the reaction-diffusion model describing 50S dynamics in untreated cells. (B) Schematics of the simplified model in which the exchange rate constants are considered null in DNP-treated cells. (C) Fluorescence micrographs of a representative DNP-treated CJW3821 cell filament showing selected frames of the FRAP experiment. Postbleaching time-lapse imaging shows that there is little recovery of L1-GFP fluorescence at the bleached spot after 5 min. (D) Experimental kymograph showing the averaged postbleaching fluorescence signal dynamics measured for 56 DNP-treated cell filaments. (E) Integrated fluorescence recovery at the photobleached spot (± 0.3 μm around the center of the spot). (F) Simulated best-fit kymograph with kR+B = 0. (G) Map of residuals of the fit.

Paula Montero Llopis, et al. Biophys J. 2012 November 7;103(9):1848-1859.
5.
Figure 4

Figure 4. From: In Vivo Biochemistry in Bacterial Cells Using FRAP: Insight into the Translation Cycle.

Effect of rifampicin-treatment on the diffusion coefficient of free 50S ribosomal subunits. (A) Schematics of the simple diffusion model used for analyzing FRAP data of rifampicin-treated cell filaments (± DNP). (B) Experimental kymograph of a representative rifampicin-treated CJW3821 cell. (C) Simulated kymograph at optimum (DF = 0.36 μm2/s). (D) Residuals of the fit. (E) Integrated fluorescence recovery at the photobleached spot. (F) Histogram of DF values obtained for cells untreated with drugs (n = 21 cells), treated with DNP (n = 56 cells), treated with rifampicin (n = 21 cells), pretreated with rifampicin and then treated with DNP (n = 23 cells), and treated with kasugamycin (n = 14 cells). The errors indicate 95% confidence intervals. (GI) Same as (CE) except that simulation was done with DF fixed at 0.042 μm2/s (which is the DF value obtained for the untreated cells). (J) Fluorescence micrographs of representative DAPI-stained CJW3821 cell filaments before (left panels) and after treatment with rifampicin (right panels). (KN) Same as (BE) except for a rifampicin-treated cell spotted on a pad that contains DNP in addition to rifampicin.

Paula Montero Llopis, et al. Biophys J. 2012 November 7;103(9):1848-1859.
6.
Figure 6

Figure 6. From: In Vivo Biochemistry in Bacterial Cells Using FRAP: Insight into the Translation Cycle.

Schematic representation of the proposed 50S subunit pathway. The 50S ribosomal subunits are shown in three states based on their mRNA association: free (light gray), transiently associated with mRNA (medium gray), and stably associated with mRNA as part of a translational 70S complex (dark gray). The fraction of total 50S subunits involved in each stage is shown. During the nontranslating stage, the subunit transiently switches between free and associated states, slowing down its diffusion. These transient associations do not require cellular energy, and are proposed to involve mRNA. For example, these interactions may correspond to reversible associations with the 30S initiation complex at the RBS before the formation of the stable translation-competent 70S initiation complex (70SIC). It is also possible that 50S associates with mRNA elsewhere, possibly through an intermediate factor (X). The average lifetime of the nontranslating stage is τB = 1/kB ∼25 s. Stable association of 50S with the 30S initiation complex occurs at an average rate constant of kB ≈ 0.041 s−1; this irreversible step requires GTP hydrolysis and results in 70SIC formation. This is followed by mRNA translocation and protein synthesis for τR = 1/kR ∼60 s, after which the 50S subunit dissociates from posttermination complex at a rate constant of kR ≈ 0.018 s−1, restarting the cycle.

Paula Montero Llopis, et al. Biophys J. 2012 November 7;103(9):1848-1859.

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