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1.
Figure 2

Figure 2. From: Understanding Resistance to Combination Chemotherapy.

A diagram showing potential computational solutions revealed by the addition of two drug “signatures”. Combination treatments may reveal signatures representative of one of the component signatures. In this case, the drug combination would be expected to act like one of the parental drugs – merely at a lower dose. Alternatively, the combination signature may be an average of component signatures, in which global genetic dependencies are reduced or homogenized. Finally, a combination signature may deviate completely from component signatures – representing a neomorphic affect achieved by the drug combination.

Justin R. Pritchard, et al. Drug Resist Updat. 2012 October;15(0):249-257.
2.
Figure 1

Figure 1. From: Understanding Resistance to Combination Chemotherapy.

A diagram showing the relationship between single and combinatorial therapy and the development of drug resistance. In response to single agent treatment of bacteria or tumor cells, whether targeted or “cytotoxic”, drug target alterations or, perhaps, drug efflux, can mediate therapeutic resistance. Here lower case letters indicate specific mutations in drug target genes. Conversely, in response to combinatorial therapy, bacteria evolve specific resistance mechanisms to each agent, while mammalian cells evolve resistance to targeted therapeutics, reinforcing alterations that restore target activity as well as mechanisms of multi-drug (target non-specific) resistance.

Justin R. Pritchard, et al. Drug Resist Updat. 2012 October;15(0):249-257.

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