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1.
Figure 2

Figure 2. From: Cognitive profile of amyloid burden and white matter hyperintensities in cognitively normal older adults.

Amyloid burden and white matter hyperintensities are uncorrelated in a sample of cognitively normal older adults. Global measures of amyloid (from the FLR region) and white matter hyperintensities (WMH) were log-transformed and found to be unrelated to one another whether or not age was controlled (r = 0.10, p = .14; controlling for age: r = 0.06, p = .28).

Trey Hedden, et al. J Neurosci. ;32(46):16233-16242.
2.
Figure 1

Figure 1. From: Cognitive profile of amyloid burden and white matter hyperintensities in cognitively normal older adults.

Confirmatory factor analysis of cognitive domains. The model has good fit: χ2(79) = 85.49, p = .29, Tucker-Lewis Index = .986, Root Mean Square Error of Approximation = .022, p-value for closeness of fit = .95. Rectangles represent indicators (observed variables), circles indicate latent factors (constructs). Curved arrows indicate correlations between factors (top) or correlated error terms of indicators (bottom). Straight lines indicate path weights. The dotted line indicates the only non-hypothesized path, which was included due to a post-hoc theoretical justification and significant impact on model fit. N = 168.

Trey Hedden, et al. J Neurosci. ;32(46):16233-16242.
3.
Figure 4

Figure 4. From: Cognitive profile of amyloid burden and white matter hyperintensities in cognitively normal older adults.

Influence of amyloid burden and white matter hyperintensities on cognition. Left panel: Amyloid burden (log-transformed PiB DVR) was significantly related to memory (r = −0.21, p = .013), with no significant relation to executive function (r = 0.00, p = .50) or speed (r = −0.04, p = .34). Right panel: White matter hyperintensities (log-transformed WMH) were significantly related to executive function (r = −0.17, p = .044), but not to memory (r = −0.14, p = .08) or speed (r = −0.11, p = .13), although these relationships did not significantly differ from one another. Standardized factor scores were computed for the 109 subjects with amyloid and WMH data from the model using the full sample of 168 subjects and were residualized on age and estimated verbal intelligence.

Trey Hedden, et al. J Neurosci. ;32(46):16233-16242.
4.
Figure 3

Figure 3. From: Cognitive profile of amyloid burden and white matter hyperintensities in cognitively normal older adults.

Impact of age, estimated verbal intelligence (VIQ), amyloid burden (PiB), and white matter hyperintensities (WMH) on cognitive factors. The observed variables of age, VIQ, PiB, and WMH were used to predict individual differences in each cognitive factor. Factor scores were computed from the full model of 168 subjects and entered as observed variables in the model for those 109 subjects with both PiB and WMH data available. The model produced good fit: χ2(5) = 6.02, p = .30, Tucker-Lewis Index = .985, Root Mean Square Error of Approximation = .043, p-value for closeness of fit = .45. The curved arrow indicates the only significant correlation among the predictor variables. Straight lines indicate path weights. Solid bolded lines indicate paths significant at p<.025 one-tailed, solid non-bolded lines indicate paths significant at p<.05 one-tailed; dashed lines indicate non-significant paths. Grayed out factors are represented only implicitly in the model because they contributed to the computation of the executive function 2nd-order factor score.

Trey Hedden, et al. J Neurosci. ;32(46):16233-16242.

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