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Results: 3

1.
Fig. 1

Fig. 1. From: Socio-cultural reflections on heat in Australia with implications for health and climate change adaptation.

Average annual temperatures in Australia, showing states, territories, and their capital cities.

Cathy Banwell, et al. Glob Health Action. 2012;5:10.3402/gha.v5i0.19277.
2.
Fig. 3

Fig. 3. From: Socio-cultural reflections on heat in Australia with implications for health and climate change adaptation.

Annual maximum temperatures recorded at Badgery's Creek, at the centre of the study region.

Cathy Banwell, et al. Glob Health Action. 2012;5:10.3402/gha.v5i0.19277.
3.
Fig. 2

Fig. 2. From: Socio-cultural reflections on heat in Australia with implications for health and climate change adaptation.

Temperature–mortality zones for Australian states and territories. In the ‘hot zone’ (red), the relative risk of death is increased with higher daily maximum temperatures, whereas relative risk of death is increased with lower maximum daily temperatures in the ‘cold zone’ (blue).

Cathy Banwell, et al. Glob Health Action. 2012;5:10.3402/gha.v5i0.19277.

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