Display Settings:

Items per page

Results: 6

1.
Fig. 1

Fig. 1. From: Navigation of a Telepresence Robot via Covert Visuospatial Attention and Real-Time fMRI.

Illustration of the experiment timeline

Patrik Andersson, et al. Brain Topogr. 2013 January;26(1):177-185.
2.
Fig. 3

Fig. 3. From: Navigation of a Telepresence Robot via Covert Visuospatial Attention and Real-Time fMRI.

The BCI system. The system consists of the MR scanner, two computers and the robot

Patrik Andersson, et al. Brain Topogr. 2013 January;26(1):177-185.
3.
Fig. 4

Fig. 4. From: Navigation of a Telepresence Robot via Covert Visuospatial Attention and Real-Time fMRI.

Map of the robot control environment with the positions of the four targets. The robot started at target four and the instructions were to reach the targets in sequence

Patrik Andersson, et al. Brain Topogr. 2013 January;26(1):177-185.
4.
Fig. 6

Fig. 6. From: Navigation of a Telepresence Robot via Covert Visuospatial Attention and Real-Time fMRI.

The robot’s paths during the navigation. The path is only shown to the point where the last target was reached. Only the forward movements are shown, and a sequence of instructions such as right-left-forward is displayed as one forward movement. Each gray "robot symbol" symbolizes the position after a forward movement. The robot’s position when hitting a target is indicated with a circle containing the target number

Patrik Andersson, et al. Brain Topogr. 2013 January;26(1):177-185.
5.
Fig. 2

Fig. 2. From: Navigation of a Telepresence Robot via Covert Visuospatial Attention and Real-Time fMRI.

The feedback screen. The screen projected to the user during a the localizer phase, and b the control phase. The three yellow triangles served as targets for left, right and up attention. The green circle in the center indicates the point upon which the gaze had to be focused at all times. During the localizer phase the subjects direct their attention in response to a central cue (a shows the cue for right attention). During the control phase the video from the robot’s camera was displayed in the central area (Color figure online)

Patrik Andersson, et al. Brain Topogr. 2013 January;26(1):177-185.
6.
Fig. 5

Fig. 5. From: Navigation of a Telepresence Robot via Covert Visuospatial Attention and Real-Time fMRI.

Voxels selected in the online GLM analysis, displayed on the Montreal Neurological Institute (MNI) reference brain. Four statistical t maps, each corresponding to an attention direction, were computed online during data acquisition. From each of these t maps a mask was created by first locating the 500 highest t values and then removing any cluster smaller than five voxels. In the online analysis the masks were merged to create the voxel selection to train the SVM on. In this figure, the masks from all subjects were spatially normalized and added, separately for each attention direction. It should be noted that the spatial normalization was applied only for illustration purposes and was not a part of the online analysis. With four subjects and two (performance) sessions each, the sum could take values between 1 and 8. However, since no voxel was selected in more than five sessions, the scale of the overlays is adjusted to this value

Patrik Andersson, et al. Brain Topogr. 2013 January;26(1):177-185.

Display Settings:

Items per page

Supplemental Content

Recent activity

Your browsing activity is empty.

Activity recording is turned off.

Turn recording back on

See more...
Write to the Help Desk