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Results: 4

1.
Figure 1

Figure 1. From: The Genetic Basis of Pancreas Cancer Development and Progression: Insights From Whole-Exome and Whole-Genome Sequencing.

Histology of pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN). The moderate dysplasia present makes this lesion a PanIN-2.

Christine A. Iacobuzio-Donahue, et al. Clin Cancer Res. 2012 August 15;18(16):4257-4265.
2.
Figure 3

Figure 3. From: The Genetic Basis of Pancreas Cancer Development and Progression: Insights From Whole-Exome and Whole-Genome Sequencing.

Model of the progression from a normal cell to metastatic pancreatic cancer. (Based on an original illustration by Bona Kim).

Christine A. Iacobuzio-Donahue, et al. Clin Cancer Res. 2012 August 15;18(16):4257-4265.
3.
Figure 4

Figure 4. From: The Genetic Basis of Pancreas Cancer Development and Progression: Insights From Whole-Exome and Whole-Genome Sequencing.

Three scenarios for the clinical application of mutational analyses. A) Sequencing the germline of individuals with a family history. B) Sequencing endoscopically obtained cyst fluid. C) Sequencing the cancer itself. (Based on an original illustration by Bona Kim).

Christine A. Iacobuzio-Donahue, et al. Clin Cancer Res. 2012 August 15;18(16):4257-4265.
4.
Figure 2

Figure 2. From: The Genetic Basis of Pancreas Cancer Development and Progression: Insights From Whole-Exome and Whole-Genome Sequencing.

The four most common cystic neoplasms of the pancreas include intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (A), mucinous cystic neoplasm with high-grade dysplasia (B), solid-pseudopapillary neoplasm (C), and serous cystadenoma (D).

Christine A. Iacobuzio-Donahue, et al. Clin Cancer Res. 2012 August 15;18(16):4257-4265.

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