Results: 4

1.
Figure 1

Figure 1. From: The Effect of Particle Size on the Biodistribution of Low-modulus Hydrogel PRINT Particles.

Fluorescent images of the particles used for the in vivo studies. The particles have hydrated diameters of (A) 0.78 μm (B) 3.79 ± 0.17 μm, (C) 6.39 ± 0.56 μm, and (D) 8.88 ± 0.47 μm. Diameters were measured by dynamic light scattering (A) or by analysis of multiple fluorescent images (B–D) using Axiovision LE software. Scale bars are 20 μm.

Timothy J. Merkel, et al. J Control Release. ;162(1):37-44.
2.
Figure 3

Figure 3. From: The Effect of Particle Size on the Biodistribution of Low-modulus Hydrogel PRINT Particles.

Semi-log plot showing the biodistribution of highly deformable particles of different sizes in mice over the course of 5 days as measured by the percent of total fluorescence recovered. The fluorescent signal from the particles in each whole tissue examined is shown for particles with diameters of (A) 0.78 μm, (B) 3.8 μm, (C) 6.4 μm and (D) 8.9 μm. Lines have been added to connect the data points for clarity only. Four mice were examined per time-point, with error bars representing one standard deviation.

Timothy J. Merkel, et al. J Control Release. ;162(1):37-44.
3.
Figure 4

Figure 4. From: The Effect of Particle Size on the Biodistribution of Low-modulus Hydrogel PRINT Particles.

Semi-log plot showing the biodistribution of highly deformable particles of different sizes in mice over the course of 5 days as measured by the percent of total recovered fluorescent signal from the particles, and adjusted by the weight of each tissue. Data is shown for particles with diameters of (A) 0.78 μm, (B) 3.8 μm, (C) 6.4 μm and (D) 8.9 μm. Lines have been added to connect the data points for clarity only. Four mice were examined per time-point, with error bars representing one standard deviation.

Timothy J. Merkel, et al. J Control Release. ;162(1):37-44.
4.
Figure 2

Figure 2. From: The Effect of Particle Size on the Biodistribution of Low-modulus Hydrogel PRINT Particles.

Change in particle concentration in blood over time for deformable hydrogel particles of different sizes. Curves generated by application of a two-compartment pharmacokinetic model are shown with solid lines. The largest of these particles, with hydrated diameters of 8.9 μm, were cleared to concentrations below the limits of quantification after 7 hours and were not well-described by the pharmacokinetic model due to increases in concentration before falling under the quantification limit. Each data point represents 4 mice, with error bars representing one standard deviation. linear regression analysis [17].

Timothy J. Merkel, et al. J Control Release. ;162(1):37-44.

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