Results: 3

1.
Figure 2

Figure 2. Prevalence of the Four States of Clinical Disability during the 4-Year Study. From: Lifestyle Change and Mobility in Obese Adults with Type 2 Diabetes.

The numbers in each color block are the percentages of participants at each state of mobility-related disability among those receiving diabetes support and education and those receiving an intensive lifestyle intervention. Values at follow-up visits for years 1 to 4 have been adjusted for baseline values.

W. Jack Rejeski, et al. N Engl J Med. ;366(13):1209-1217.
2.
Figure 1

Figure 1. Model of Four States of Clinical Disability. From: Lifestyle Change and Mobility in Obese Adults with Type 2 Diabetes.

In state 1 (good mobility), participants had some difficulty in performing vigorous physical activities. In state 2 (mild mobility-related disability), participants had problems in bending and long-distance walking. In state 3 (moderate mobility-related disability), participants had deficits in many tasks and some deterioration in the ability to climb stairs and engage in moderately demanding activities. In state 4 (severe limitations), participants had difficulty in nearly all tasks. In each category, the longer the horizontal bar, the higher the probability that participants could perform that task without difficulty.

W. Jack Rejeski, et al. N Engl J Med. ;366(13):1209-1217.
3.
Figure 3

Figure 3. Path Diagram for Mediational Model. From: Lifestyle Change and Mobility in Obese Adults with Type 2 Diabetes.

The four solid arrows represent significant indirect effects, and the dashed arrow represents a marginally significant direct effect of the intervention on mobility after adjustment for the mediators. The coefficients and 95% confidence intervals are positioned at the middle of each arrow; those on the arrows leading from the intervention to each mediator represent the percent weight loss and fitness improvement owing to the intervention. The coefficients for the effect that weight loss and improved fitness had on disability show that for every 1% loss in weight there was a 7.3% reduction in the odds ratio for disability [(1.00 − 0.927) × 100], and for every 1% improvement in fitness [(1.00 − 0.986) × 100], the odds ratio was reduced by 1.4%.

W. Jack Rejeski, et al. N Engl J Med. ;366(13):1209-1217.

Supplemental Content

Recent activity

Your browsing activity is empty.

Activity recording is turned off.

Turn recording back on

See more...
Write to the Help Desk