Display Settings:

Items per page

Results: 7

1.
Fig. 7.

Fig. 7. From: Forecasting sudden changes in environmental pollution patterns.

As in Fig. 5 but with initial positions within the LCS core identified on June 9, 2010.

María J. Olascoaga, et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2012 March 27;109(13):4738-4743.
2.
Fig. 2.

Fig. 2. From: Forecasting sudden changes in environmental pollution patterns.

(A) The deformation of an initially circular tracer blob in the presence of a nearby attracting LCS between times t0 - T and t0. (B) The hyperbolic core of an LCS at the present time t0.

María J. Olascoaga, et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2012 March 27;109(13):4738-4743.
3.
Fig. 6.

Fig. 6. From: Forecasting sudden changes in environmental pollution patterns.

LCS-core-based forecasting of the coastal-spread instability in the DWH oil spill. Colors and symbols are as in Fig. 4. A major inward instability is accurately forecasted about 9 d ahead of its full development.

María J. Olascoaga, et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2012 March 27;109(13):4738-4743.
4.
Fig. 5.

Fig. 5. From: Forecasting sudden changes in environmental pollution patterns.

Snapshots of the evolution of observed surface oil (brown tone patches), and the positions of synthetic fluid particles (blue) initially lying within the LCS core identified on May 11, 2010. The red curves indicate attracting LCSs. The black triangle indicates the DWH oil well.

María J. Olascoaga, et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2012 March 27;109(13):4738-4743.
5.
Fig. 1.

Fig. 1. From: Forecasting sudden changes in environmental pollution patterns.

(A) The deformation of a tracer blob D(t) under the flow map . (B) Outward fingering-type instability of a tracer pattern D(t) in a steady flow, caused by as saddle point p located inside the initial tracer distribution D(t0). (C) Inward fingering-type instability of a tracer pattern D(t) in a steady flow, caused by as saddle point q located outside the initial tracer distribution D(t0).

María J. Olascoaga, et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2012 March 27;109(13):4738-4743.
6.
Fig. 3.

Fig. 3. From: Forecasting sudden changes in environmental pollution patterns.

Snapshots from the periods May 8, 2010–May 17, 2010 (Upper) and June 10, 2011–June 19, 2011 (Lower), showing observed oil distribution on the surface of the northern Gulf of Mexico. The black curve in each panel indicates the silhouette of the oil slick on the last day shown. The box in the inserted map in the Upper panel shows the specific area under study. The triangle in each map indicates the DWH oil spill site.

María J. Olascoaga, et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2012 March 27;109(13):4738-4743.
7.
Fig. 4.

Fig. 4. From: Forecasting sudden changes in environmental pollution patterns.

LCS-core-based forecasting of the tiger-tail instability. Selected snapshots of the satellite-observed oil distribution (brown tone patches) are shown along with identified attracting LCS-core centroid locations (circles) and corresponding Lagrangian stretching directions (arrows), all within a circular area of 200-km-radius (dashed circle) centered at the DWH oil spill site (triangle). Small-scale inward fingering instabilities due to weaker LCS cores are correctly now-casted (A). A major outward instability is accurately forecasted about 8 d ahead of its full development (B). Only velocities up to each time t0 shown are used in this analysis; no input from future surface–velocity model forecasts is assumed.

María J. Olascoaga, et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2012 March 27;109(13):4738-4743.

Display Settings:

Items per page

Supplemental Content

Recent activity

Your browsing activity is empty.

Activity recording is turned off.

Turn recording back on

See more...
Write to the Help Desk