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Results: 4

1.
Fig 2

Fig 2. From: Influenza Virus Sequence Feature Variant Type Analysis: Evidence of a Role for NS1 in Influenza Virus Host Range Restriction.

Correlation between SF length and number of observed VTs. Scatter plots are used to display the correlations between the length of each SF and the total number of VTs it contains for all structural SFs (A), all functional SFs (B), and immune epitopes (C) of the H1 subtype of HA protein. A best-fit line is drawn for each graph. Graphs A and B are generated on a log-log scale to better represent the broad range of data.

Jyothi M. Noronha, et al. J Virol. 2012 May;86(10):5857-5866.
2.
Fig 4

Fig 4. From: Influenza Virus Sequence Feature Variant Type Analysis: Evidence of a Role for NS1 in Influenza Virus Host Range Restriction.

SFVT lineage tree. The heritage of the first 16 VTs of NS1 Influenza virus A_NS1_SF18 was inferred from the phylogenetic analysis of the amino acid sequences and the apparent accumulation of amino acid substitutions at the time of first appearance of a particular VT in the sequence record (in parentheses) from 1902 to 2010. Each VT group is color coded based on the host in which it has circulated. Also shown are the amino acid substitutions (position and amino acid change) that caused each VT group to be assigned to subsequent “progeny” VTs.

Jyothi M. Noronha, et al. J Virol. 2012 May;86(10):5857-5866.
3.
Fig 3

Fig 3. From: Influenza Virus Sequence Feature Variant Type Analysis: Evidence of a Role for NS1 in Influenza Virus Host Range Restriction.

Distribution of host proportions across VTs of Influenza virus A_NS1_SF18. VTs were divided into four groups based on their host representation patterns. (A) VT-8-carrying viruses were isolated predominantly from equine (and dog; included in the “Others” category). (B) VT-4-, 7-, 11-, 12-, 13-, and 14-carrying viruses were isolated predominantly from chicken and other avian species and environmental samples. (The majority of environmental samples appear to be derived from avian feces.) (C) VT-3-, 5-, 9-, 10-, and 16-carrying viruses were isolated predominantly from human hosts. (D) VT-1-, 2-, 6-, and 15-carrying viruses were isolated from a broad range of different hosts.

Jyothi M. Noronha, et al. J Virol. 2012 May;86(10):5857-5866.
4.
Fig 1

Fig 1. From: Influenza Virus Sequence Feature Variant Type Analysis: Evidence of a Role for NS1 in Influenza Virus Host Range Restriction.

Examples of selected NS1 SFs and corresponding VTs. Examples of two different structural and four different functional SFs are shown highlighted in blue on the 3-dimensional protein structure of the influenza A virus NS1 protein (PDB identifier 2GX9) on the left side of each panel: Influenza virus A_NS1_alpha-helix_170(19) (A), Influenza virus A_NS1_beta-strand_107(6) (B), Influenza virus A_NS1_CPSF30-binding-site_103(28) (C), Influenza virus A_NS1_nuclear-export-signal_137(11) (D), Influenza virus A_NS1_NES-mask_148(14) (E), and Influenza virus A_NS1_PKR-binding-site_123(4) (F). The right side of each panel shows tables of the first 10 VTs for each of these SFs with the amino acid residues that differ from the A/Udorn/1972 reference strain highlighted in red. The number of influenza virus strains that carry the given VT (strain count) is shown on the left side of the table. The number of amino acid positions that vary in comparison to the Udorn reference (no. of variations) is shown on the right side; the number of strains that bear the same amino acid sequence VT as the Udorn reference range from 201 for the CPSF30-binding site SF to 11,703 for the nuclear export signal mask SF.

Jyothi M. Noronha, et al. J Virol. 2012 May;86(10):5857-5866.

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