Display Settings:

Items per page
We are sorry, but NCBI web applications do not support your browser and may not function properly. More information

Results: 7

1.
Figure 3

Figure 3. From: Allele- and Tir-Independent Functions of Intimin in Diverse Animal Infection Models.

Enterohemorrhagic E. coli intimin can complement a C. rodentium eae mutant for AE lesion formation in vivo. Transmission electron micrograph showing AE pedestal formation on colonic epithelial cells from the distal colon of mice infected with C. rodentiumΔeae/pIntEHEC. Original magnification, 25,000×. Bar, 0.5 μm.

Emily M. Mallick, et al. Front Microbiol. 2012;3:11.
2.
Figure 1

Figure 1. From: Allele- and Tir-Independent Functions of Intimin in Diverse Animal Infection Models.

An EHEC strain containing EPEC intimin on the chromosome is functional for pedestal formation. (A) The endogenous EHEC eae gene was precisely replaced by EPEC eae to create LM-1. (B) Expression of EHEC and EPEC intimin in wild type EHEC, EHECΔeae, and LM-1 was assessed by western blot. Blotting with anti-OmpA was included as a loading control. (C) HeLa cells were infected with the indicated strain and the monolayers were stained with DAPI (blue) to visualize bound bacteria and phalloidin (red) to visualize actin pedestals.

Emily M. Mallick, et al. Front Microbiol. 2012;3:11.
3.
Figure 5

Figure 5. From: Allele- and Tir-Independent Functions of Intimin in Diverse Animal Infection Models.

Enterohemorrhagic E. coli intimin, but not a Tir-binding invasin–intimin hybrid, promotes Tir clustering and pedestal formation by C. rodentium. Monolayers were infected with the indicated C. rodentium (“Cr”) strains and stained with DAPI to visualize bacteria (blue), anti-EHEC Tir antibody (green), and fluorescent phalloidin (red) to detect F-actin. Twenty-five bound bacteria were scored for their association with Tir foci or pedestals. †Note that when quantifying the percentage of cells infected with C. rodentiumΔeae that had Tir foci and/or actin pedestals associated with bound bacteria, many more cells needed to be counted given the inability of this strain to adhere efficiently to cells. Data represent quadruplicate samples. Asterisk indicates that percent positive bacteria is significantly (p < 0.05) greater than that for C. rodentiumΔeae. “#” Indicates that percent positive bacteria is significantly (p < 0.05) lower than that for C. rodentium/pIntEHEC.

Emily M. Mallick, et al. Front Microbiol. 2012;3:11.
4.
Figure 2

Figure 2. From: Allele- and Tir-Independent Functions of Intimin in Diverse Animal Infection Models.

Enterohemorrhagic E. coli intimin is able to restore colonization and disease in a C. rodentium eae mutant. (A) Colonization of eight-week-old C57BL/6 mice by C. rodentium (“Cr”), C. rodentiumΔeae, C. rodentiumΔeae/pIntEPEC, or C. rodentiumΔeae/pIntEHEC was determined by viable stool counts. Shown are the averages CFU (±SEM) of five mice. Data shown are representative of one of three independent experiments. (B) Hematoxylin and eosin stained large intestinal sections from mock-infected mice or mice infected with indicated strain are shown under 100× magnification. Arrow heads point to ragged areas of the surface epithelium at sites of surface erosion. Arrows point to areas of many goblet cells. Asterisks indicate areas of active inflammation. Scale bars measure 50 μm.

Emily M. Mallick, et al. Front Microbiol. 2012;3:11.
5.
Figure 7

Figure 7. From: Allele- and Tir-Independent Functions of Intimin in Diverse Animal Infection Models.

Intimin but not Tir is required for colonization of streptomycin pre-treated mice by C. rodentium. (A,B) Eight-week-old C57BL/6 mice were pre-treated with streptomycin in their drinking water for 48 h prior to being inoculated with approximately 5 × 109 CFU of indicated C. rodentium strains by oral gavage (see Materials and Methods), with the exception of C. rodentiumΔtir in (A), in which approximately 106 CFU were inoculated. Colonization was determined by viable stool counts, and shown are the averages CFU (±SEM) of three to five mice per group. [Note that the slightly lower level of colonization by C. rodentiumΔtir in (A) at three days post-infection was likely due to the lower inoculum used]. Each strain was tested in at least two independent experiments.

Emily M. Mallick, et al. Front Microbiol. 2012;3:11.
6.
Figure 6

Figure 6. From: Allele- and Tir-Independent Functions of Intimin in Diverse Animal Infection Models.

A Tir-binding invasin–intimin fusion protein does not promote murine colonization by C. rodentium. (A) Eight-week-old C57BL/6 mice were inoculated with indicated C. rodentium strains by oral gavage and intestinal colonization was determined by viable stool counts. Shown are the averages CFU (±SEM) of groups of five mice. Each strain was tested in at least three independent experiments. The data displayed includes data from two different experiments, one in which C. rodentiumΔeae/pInv and C. rodentiumΔeae were analyzed and another in which the remaining strains were tested. The combined results are overlaid on the graph for ease of comparison. (B) Hematoxylin and eosin stained large intestinal sections from mice infected with designated strain were analyzed upon 100× magnification. Scale bars measure 50 μm. Arrow heads indicate foci of epithelial surface disruption. Arrows indicate areas of goblet cells and asterisks indicate foci of active inflammation.

Emily M. Mallick, et al. Front Microbiol. 2012;3:11.
7.
Figure 4

Figure 4. From: Allele- and Tir-Independent Functions of Intimin in Diverse Animal Infection Models.

A hybrid containing the C-terminal 395 amino acids of EHEC intimin can complement a C. rodentium eae mutant for host cell attachment. (A) HEp-2 cells pre-infected with an EPECΔeae strain were infected with wild type C. rodentium, C. rodentiumΔeae, or C. rodentiumΔeae strains expressing EHEC intimin, invasin, or the indicated invasin–EHEC intimin hybrids (Inv–Int395, Inv–Int181, and Inv–Int100), and stably bound bacteria were determined (Materials and Methods). Data are shown as the mean ± SEM and represent two independent assays with at least three replicates per assay. Asterisk indicates binding significantly (p < 0.05) higher than C. rodentiumΔeae of C. rodentiumΔeae expressing pInv–Int181 or pInv–Int100, determined by two-tailed unpaired t-test. (B) Mouse embryonic fibroblasts were infected with the indicated C. rodentium strains and the number of bound bacteria per cell was counted for four sets of 25 randomly selected cells. Shown are the number of cells with the given number (0, 1–5, 6–10, 11–15, 16–20, and >20) of bound bacteria. The experiment was performed in triplicate. Shown in box is the mean number of bacteria per cell ± SEM. Asterisk indicates a significant difference (p < 0.05) compared to C. rodentiumΔeae, determined using a one-way ANOVA test.

Emily M. Mallick, et al. Front Microbiol. 2012;3:11.

Display Settings:

Items per page

Supplemental Content

Recent activity

Your browsing activity is empty.

Activity recording is turned off.

Turn recording back on

See more...
Write to the Help Desk