Results: 5

1.
Figure 1

Figure 1. BOLD activations during extinction training and extinction recall. From: Resting amygdala and medial prefrontal metabolism predicts functional activation of the fear extinction circuit.

The BOLD responses during extinction training (left) represent activations to the conditioned stimulus during late extinction contrasted with early extinction. The recall contrast (right) represents activations to the extinguished cue contrasted with activations to the non-extinguished cue. Activation maps are illustrated with a threshold of t (17) > ±2.11 (puncorrected < 0.05) and overlaid on a template structural MRI image.

Clas Linnman, et al. Am J Psychiatry. ;169(4):415-423.
2.
Figure 4

Figure 4. Resting pre-training ventromedial prefrontal cortex metabolism predicts amygdala functional activity during extinction training. From: Resting amygdala and medial prefrontal metabolism predicts functional activation of the fear extinction circuit.

Metabolism in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex was extracted and used to predict BOLD activations during extinction training. Ventromedial prefrontal cortex metabolism positively predicted left amygdala responses (r = 0.76). Correlated responses are illustrated with a threshold of t (17) > ±2.11 (puncorrected < 0.05) and overlaid on a template structural MRI image.

Clas Linnman, et al. Am J Psychiatry. ;169(4):415-423.
3.
Figure 5

Figure 5. Ventromedial prefrontal cortex/dorsal anterior cingulate cortex resting metabolic ratio predicts prefrontal cortex functional activity during extinction recall. From: Resting amygdala and medial prefrontal metabolism predicts functional activation of the fear extinction circuit.

The ratio of ventromedial prefrontal cortex to dorsal anterior cingulate cortex metabolism was calculated and used as to predict BOLD activations elicited during extinction recall. The ventromedial prefrontal cortex/dorsal anterior cingulate cortex ratio was positively correlated to genual anterior cingulate extinction recall responses (r = 0.65). Correlated responses are illustrated with a threshold of t (17) > ± 2.11 (puncorrected < 0.05) and overlaid on a template structural MRI image.

Clas Linnman, et al. Am J Psychiatry. ;169(4):415-423.
4.
Figure 2

Figure 2. Resting pre-training dorsal anterior cingulate cortex metabolism predicts differential skin conductance responses during extinction recall. From: Resting amygdala and medial prefrontal metabolism predicts functional activation of the fear extinction circuit.

Whole brain correlation map showing that dorsal anterior cingulate cortex metabolism was positively correlated with skin conductance responses to the extinguished cue (minus the CS-; r = −0.80), indicative of spontaneously recovered fear. Correlated responses are illustrated with a threshold of t (17) > ±2.11 (puncorrected < 0.05) and overlaid on the average metabolism PET maps from the study.

Clas Linnman, et al. Am J Psychiatry. ;169(4):415-423.
5.
Figure 3

Figure 3. Resting amygdala metabolism predicts functional activations in dorsal anterior cingulate cortex and ventromedial prefrontal cortex during extinction training and extinction recall. From: Resting amygdala and medial prefrontal metabolism predicts functional activation of the fear extinction circuit.

Resting metabolisms in the left and the right amygdala were extracted and used to predict BOLD activations elicited during extinction training and extinction recall. Left amygdala metabolism (a) negatively predicted dorsal anterior cingulate cortex responses during extinction training, but it positively predicted dorsal anterior cingulate cortex responses during extinction recall. Right amygdala metabolism (b) positively predicted ventromedial prefrontal cortex responses during extinction training, but it negatively predicted ventromedial prefrontal cortex responses during extinction recall. Correlated responses are illustrated with a threshold of t (17) > ±2.11 (puncorrected < 0.05) and overlaid on a template structural MR image.

Clas Linnman, et al. Am J Psychiatry. ;169(4):415-423.

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