Results: 3

1.
Figure 1

Figure 1. From: Medial Prefrontal Functional Connectivity - Relation to Memory Self-appraisal Accuracy in Older Adults with and without Memory Disorders.

Main effect (Self > Semantic) of the self-appraisal fMRI task administered to 90 cognitively-healthy adults (pFWE < .001). Renderings are on A) a mid-sagittal view of the statistical parametric map and B) a glass brain showing the extent of activation at this threshold in 3 dimensions.

Michele L. Ries, et al. Neuropsychologia. ;50(5):603-611.
2.
Figure 2

Figure 2. From: Medial Prefrontal Functional Connectivity - Relation to Memory Self-appraisal Accuracy in Older Adults with and without Memory Disorders.

Psychophysiologic interaction analysis results from 90 cognitively-healthy adults who completed a self-appraisal fMRI task. Regions of significance show more positive correlation in BOLD response with the MPFC seed during self-appraisal than during judgment of affective valence. Results were used to create a binary explicit mask for the results of the memory awareness regression analysis in Figure 3.

Michele L. Ries, et al. Neuropsychologia. ;50(5):603-611.
3.
Figure 3

Figure 3. From: Medial Prefrontal Functional Connectivity - Relation to Memory Self-appraisal Accuracy in Older Adults with and without Memory Disorders.

Results of the regression of Memory Function Discrepancy scores on MPFC functional connectivity. Age, sex and scores on the Hopkins Verbal Learning Test Total 1–3 and GDS were included in the statistical model. A) Significant results (p < 0.001) are superimposed on the explicit mask generated from results shown in Figure 2. B) Graphical depiction (for illustrative purposes) of the negative relationship between MPFC functional connectivity with the left DLPFC cluster (which contained the global maxima at -38, 42, 22) and MFD scores. MFD scores reported on the x-axis have been back transformed from log to raw scores. Data points are color-coded to indicate whether the participant was a control or had a diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment or Alzheimer’s disease.

Michele L. Ries, et al. Neuropsychologia. ;50(5):603-611.

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