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Results: 8

1.
Fig. 3.

Fig. 3. From: Frequency dependence of vestibuloocular reflex thresholds.

A–C: example horizontal eye trajectories for 1-s-duration (1 Hz) stimuli, with decreasing motion amplitude from left to right (D–F). Note that the y-axis for the eye position signals (A–C) changes to help highlight changes in eye position.

Csilla Haburcakova, et al. J Neurophysiol. 2012 February;107(3):973-983.
2.
Fig. 8.

Fig. 8. From: Frequency dependence of vestibuloocular reflex thresholds.

Conceptual pathways showing possible divergence of VOR and perceptual pathways. A: parallel pathways could begin as early as the vestibular periphery or vestibular nuclei. B: perceptual motion discrimination pathways could diverge early, with yaw motion sensation and VOR pathways diverging after common velocity storage calculations. C: signals for motion discrimination pathways could diverge from neurons carrying yaw rotation sensation after velocity storage contributions.

Csilla Haburcakova, et al. J Neurophysiol. 2012 February;107(3):973-983.
3.
Fig. 5.

Fig. 5. From: Frequency dependence of vestibuloocular reflex thresholds.

Vestibuloocular reflex (VOR) fitted biases as a function of frequency. Fitted biases were always the same sign for each of 3 monkeys across frequency. There was some evidence that the fit bias varied somewhat over time, but our study design does not allow a quantitative analysis of such an effect. Fit biases shown are from the less conservative analysis.

Csilla Haburcakova, et al. J Neurophysiol. 2012 February;107(3):973-983.
4.
Fig. 1.

Fig. 1. From: Frequency dependence of vestibuloocular reflex thresholds.

Example stimuli at 1 Hz. Black traces show theoretical motion trajectories. Traces show single cycle of sinusoidal angular acceleration (A), which is bidirectional, resulting angular velocity (B), which is unidirectional, and angular displacement (C), which is unidirectional. C also shows an actual position trajectory recorded at 60 Hz, which is the data rate for the Moog platform, on a single trial (gray dots) overlaid on theoretic displacement (black).

Csilla Haburcakova, et al. J Neurophysiol. 2012 February;107(3):973-983.
5.
Fig. 4.

Fig. 4. From: Frequency dependence of vestibuloocular reflex thresholds.

Percent eye rotation to the right is plotted vs. peak velocity amplitude for each monkey at each frequency. Data from S1 (A–C), S2 (D–H), and S3 (I–M), are shown at left, center, and right, respectively. Each row shows data acquired at a different frequency (top row, 0.2 Hz; 2nd row, 0.3 Hz; 3rd row, 1 Hz; 4th row, 2 Hz; bottom row, 3 Hz). The maximum likelihood fit of a cumulative Gaussian is shown as the solid curve for each example. Fitted parameters yielding fits shown are provided in Table 2.

Csilla Haburcakova, et al. J Neurophysiol. 2012 February;107(3):973-983.
6.
Fig. 6.

Fig. 6. From: Frequency dependence of vestibuloocular reflex thresholds.

VOR “one-sigma” thresholds (Tσ) compared with human perceptual thresholds. Filled symbols show the VOR thresholds for each of the 3 monkeys plotted vs. frequency. The frequency for some data points is offset slightly for clarity. For context, the open symbols show average human perceptual thresholds (Grabherr et al. 2008) converted to one-sigma thresholds. The solid line shows the least-squares fit to the human threshold data, with the shaded area indicating 1 standard deviation from the mean. Because of lognormal distribution of human thresholds, standard deviations are not symmetrical on plot. VOR thresholds shown are from the less conservative analysis.

Csilla Haburcakova, et al. J Neurophysiol. 2012 February;107(3):973-983.
7.
Fig. 7.

Fig. 7. From: Frequency dependence of vestibuloocular reflex thresholds.

Eye oscillations. A: time traces of horizontal eye position (black) and cardiac potential (gray) show a small eye oscillation that appears synchronized with cardiac potential. Such oscillations were observed in all 3 animals and were observed on roughly half of the trials. The oscillations typically had a frequency between 2 and 4 Hz and were only observed when the small eye displacement traces were expanded for near-threshold eye motion. B: example of average eye oscillations synchronized with the peak of an electrocardiogram signal acquired simultaneously. Note that B has a very different time scale from A. C: example time trace with stationary calibration coil to demonstrate relative size of electronic coil measurement noise.

Csilla Haburcakova, et al. J Neurophysiol. 2012 February;107(3):973-983.
8.
Fig. 2.

Fig. 2. From: Frequency dependence of vestibuloocular reflex thresholds.

Black and white example of display provided to operator for data analysis. To demonstrate the analysis in full detail, we intentionally show replicas of the plots observed by the operator during analysis. Because the goal is primarily to show the display observed during analysis, minimal “touching-up” has been performed for publication purposes. A and B: horizontal eye position. C and D: vertical eye position. E and F: rotation position, including the mirror image of position profile. The 2 columns show data from the same trial but with different time scales. The right column focuses exclusively on actual motion. The left column shows eye position for 0.5 s before and 0.3 s after motion. Gray bars show the time period used for automatic displacement calculations. The upward sloping dashed line in A shows the horizontal eye position change automatically calculated by the program. The downward sloping gray line in A shows an operator-selected eye position change that eliminated the influence of the fast phase. The dashed vertical lines in C and E show the beginning and end of the trial. Operators saw this information on a color LCD display.

Csilla Haburcakova, et al. J Neurophysiol. 2012 February;107(3):973-983.

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