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Results: 6

1.
Figure 1

Figure 1. From: A physical map of Brassica oleracea shows complexity of chromosomal changes following recursive paleopolyploidizations.

FPC analytical pipeline used to assemble the Brassica oleracea physical map.

Xiyin Wang, et al. BMC Genomics. 2011;12:470-470.
2.
Figure 5

Figure 5. From: A physical map of Brassica oleracea shows complexity of chromosomal changes following recursive paleopolyploidizations.

Phylogeny of centromeric repeats in B. oleracea and B. rapa. B. oleracea repeat ids start with "To" and B. rapa repeat ids start with "Br". CentBr1 repeats end with "1". CentBr2 repeats (ending with "2") are denoted with red branches.

Xiyin Wang, et al. BMC Genomics. 2011;12:470-470.
3.
Figure 3

Figure 3. From: A physical map of Brassica oleracea shows complexity of chromosomal changes following recursive paleopolyploidizations.

Characteristics of B. oleracea (Bo) contigs mapped onto the A. thaliana (At) genome. (A) Size of anchored regions based on length of Arabidopsis sequences covered; Sequence similarity (B) and BLAST E-values (C) between anchored Bo and At sequences.

Xiyin Wang, et al. BMC Genomics. 2011;12:470-470.
4.
Figure 2

Figure 2. From: A physical map of Brassica oleracea shows complexity of chromosomal changes following recursive paleopolyploidizations.

An example of a Brassica FPC contig linked to different Arabidopsis regions. The contig was displayed with 2 or 3 rows, including assembled BAC clones, overgo probes, and merging information (if available) during contig assembly. Dashed lines between Brassica BAC clones, probes and Arabidopsis genomic regions show interspecific chromosomal synteny.

Xiyin Wang, et al. BMC Genomics. 2011;12:470-470.
5.
Figure 4

Figure 4. From: A physical map of Brassica oleracea shows complexity of chromosomal changes following recursive paleopolyploidizations.

A map of Brassica oleracea and Brassica rapa contigs anchored to Arabidopsis chromosomes. Chromosomes are arranged in curved boxes, accompanied by gene densities (red), repetitive sequence densities (green), and distributions of overgo probes (blue ticks). The external light-blue and green blocks show the distribution of syntenic Brassica oleracea and Brassica rapa contigs along Arabidopsis chromosomes, respectively. Lines between chromosomes link syntenic genes in Arabidopsis, with colors distinguishing different duplicated blocks.

Xiyin Wang, et al. BMC Genomics. 2011;12:470-470.
6.
Figure 6

Figure 6. From: A physical map of Brassica oleracea shows complexity of chromosomal changes following recursive paleopolyploidizations.

Comparative mapping of Brassica FPC contigs onto the Arabidopsis genome. In subfigures (cartoons, not based on real data) A, C and D, Brassica contigs are displayed with assembled BAC clones (depicted by overlapping lines), and interspecific chromosomal synteny is shown in dashed lines. A). Interspecific chromosomal synteny inference. B). A Brassica contig (shown with a hexagon shape) is expected to be linked to multiple homologous regions in Arabidopsis (shown with circles), at most one ortholog, one α-paralog, two β-paralogs, and eight γ-paralogs. DNA losses may have removed some of them (shown with dashed-lined circles). C). A Brassica contig is linked to Arabidopsis duplicated regions. Unbalanced synteny often permits one to distinguish between orthology and paralogy, or reveals differential gene losses among paralogous regions. D). Inference of synteny discontinuity is shown for a Brassica contig against two Arabidopsis regions, which may indicate a chromosomal breakpoint during the diversification of the two species.

Xiyin Wang, et al. BMC Genomics. 2011;12:470-470.

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