Results: 4

1.
Figure 3

Figure 3. From: Effects of Sleep Apnea on Nocturnal Free Fatty Acids in Subjects with Heart Failure.

Mean nocturnal FFA versus mean nocturnal SpO2 in 12 apneic subjects, and effect of oxygen. Each increase of 1% in SpO2 was associated with a 0.034 mmol/L decrease in plasma FFA. Controls are plotted for reference. Error bars reflect standard error.

Jonathan C. Jun, et al. Sleep. 2011 September 1;34(9):1207-1213.
2.
Figure 4

Figure 4. From: Effects of Sleep Apnea on Nocturnal Free Fatty Acids in Subjects with Heart Failure.

Sleep stage at time of FFA sampling. FFA increased during stage R, N2, and N3 sleep in subjects with severe sleep apnea. This effect was abolished with oxygen supplementation. *P < 0.01 for sleep apnea CHF compared to the corresponding sleep stage of other groups. Bars reflect mean ± standard error.

Jonathan C. Jun, et al. Sleep. 2011 September 1;34(9):1207-1213.
3.
Figure 2

Figure 2. From: Effects of Sleep Apnea on Nocturnal Free Fatty Acids in Subjects with Heart Failure.

Effect of sleep apnea and its treatment with oxygen on nocturnal FFA levels. (A) FFA profiles of study subjects during sleep. Each point is the mean of 5 observations in control subjects and 12 observations in apneics. FFA level was significantly different between controls and apneics, and oxygen lowered FFA to control levels. (B) Mean nocturnal FFA (24 samples/subject) of each group, showing the intra-subject change in FFA during oxygen treatment. Ten of 12 apneics showed decreased FFA with oxygen treatment. Error bars reflect standard error.

Jonathan C. Jun, et al. Sleep. 2011 September 1;34(9):1207-1213.
4.
Figure 1

Figure 1. From: Effects of Sleep Apnea on Nocturnal Free Fatty Acids in Subjects with Heart Failure.

Sleep architecture, blood oxygen saturation, and FFA across 8 hours of sleep. In the depicted control subject (A) with mild sleep apnea, FFA remained low, with a brief increase during a transient period of hypoxemia associated with REM sleep. In (B), a subject with severe sleep apnea exhibited significant increases in FFA during hypoxemia towards the latter half of the night. When this subject was treated with oxygen on a subsequent night (C), FFA levels normalized despite a similar respiratory arousal index (18.1/h baseline, 17/h on oxygen).

Jonathan C. Jun, et al. Sleep. 2011 September 1;34(9):1207-1213.

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