Results: 3

1.
FIGURE 1.

FIGURE 1. From: The Science of Fibromyalgia.

Pain sensitivity in the general population.
From Rheum Dis Clin N Am,13 with permission from Elsevier.

Daniel J. Clauw, et al. Mayo Clin Proc. 2011 September;86(9):907-911.
2.
FIGURE 3.

FIGURE 3. From: The Science of Fibromyalgia.

Neural pathways and neurotransmitters that influence pain sensitivity.
Adapted from Rheum Dis Clin N Am,13 with permission from Elsevier.

Daniel J. Clauw, et al. Mayo Clin Proc. 2011 September;86(9):907-911.
3.
FIGURE 2.

FIGURE 2. From: The Science of Fibromyalgia.

Neuroimages of regional cerebral blood flow in areas of the brain associated with pain processing in patients with fibromyalgia and controls. These images reflect responses to stimuli during pain scans. The effects of pressure applied to the left thumb sufficient to evoke a pain rating of 11 (moderate) are compared with the effects of innocuous pressure in patients with fibromyalgia (red) and controls (green), with overlapping activations in yellow. Significant increases in the functional magnetic resonance imaging signal (arrows) resulting from increases in regional cerebral blood flow are shown in standard space superimposed on an anatomic image of a standard brain. Similar pain intensities, produced by significantly less pressure in patients with FM, resulted in overlapping or adjacent activations in the contralateral primary somatosensory cortex (SI), inferior parietal lobule (IPL), secondary somatosensory cortex (SII), superior temporal gyrus (STG), insula, and putamen, as well as in the ipsilateral cerebellum.
From Arthritis Rheum,9 with permission from John Wiley and Sons.

Daniel J. Clauw, et al. Mayo Clin Proc. 2011 September;86(9):907-911.

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