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Results: 4

1.
Fig. 2.

Fig. 2. From: Understanding Guyton's venous return curves.

Compliant circuit model. A: Fig. 5 from Guyton et al. (12), illustrating the model of the systemic circulation (used with permission). B: electrical circuit analog of model. See Glossary for definitions of abbreviations.

Daniel A. Beard, et al. Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol. 2011 September;301(3):H629-H633.
2.
Fig. 4.

Fig. 4. From: Understanding Guyton's venous return curves.

Influence of arterial resistance on circuit pressures. A: prediction from Guyton's model of the response of right atrial pressure when arterial resistance is varied with a constant cardiac output of 0.6 liter/min (an intermediate value from the data set in Figs. 1 and 3). B: the simultaneous change in arterial pressure as arterial resistance is varied. Note that as arterial resistance is increased arterial pressure increases, filling the arterial capacitor by shifting volume from the venous capacitor. Parameters are set to values indicated in Fig. 3. See Glossary for definitions of abbreviations.

Daniel A. Beard, et al. Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol. 2011 September;301(3):H629-H633.
3.
Fig. 1.

Fig. 1. From: Understanding Guyton's venous return curves.

Guyton's venous return curve. Original data from Guyton et al. (12) are plotted showing the steady-state relation between flow (F = cardiac output = venous return) and right atrial pressure (PRA) measured when flow was altered by limiting the inflow to an artificial pump with a collapsible tube. In the experiments of Guyton et al., a pump was used to bypass the right ventricle. Plotting the right atrial pressure on the abscissa incorrectly suggests that the right atrial pressure was the independent variable in the experiments. The line is a least-squares fit of Eq. A2 to the data, yielding RVR = 5.08 mmHg·min·liter−1 and PMS = 5.97 mmHg. See Glossary for definitions of abbreviations.

Daniel A. Beard, et al. Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol. 2011 September;301(3):H629-H633.
4.
Fig. 3.

Fig. 3. From: Understanding Guyton's venous return curves.

Behavior of Guyton's model with flow identified as the independent variable. A: original data from Fig. 1 are replotted with flow plotted on the abscissa. The intercept on the ordinate is the right atrial pressure (equal to the mean systemic pressure) when flow (cardiac output) is zero. Guyton et al. (12) reported the mean arterial pressure at the intercept of the abscissa as 112 mmHg. B: the calculated arterial pressure according to the model when flow is varied over the range defined in A. Note that as cardiac output is increased, arterial pressure increases and thus the arterial capacitor fills and the venous capacitor empties because the blood volume is constant. Circuit element parameters are set to values determined in the appendix: RA = 95.2 mmHg·min·liter−1, RV = 0.069 mmHg·min·liter−1, CT/CA = 19, and the mean systemic filling pressure is set to PMS = 5.97 mmHg as determined in Fig. 1. See Glossary for definitions of abbreviations.

Daniel A. Beard, et al. Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol. 2011 September;301(3):H629-H633.

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