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Results: 4

1.
Fig. 2

Fig. 2. From: Parameters that effect spine biomechanics following cervical disc replacement.

von Mises stress contours on the artificial disc under hybrid loading conditions. The stress contours are shown for the spherical shaped inferior ball component (SPH-I) and oval inferior ball component (OVL-I) designs of the artificial discs as shown in Fig. 1b

Vijay K. Goel, et al. Eur Spine J. 2012 June;21(Suppl 5):688-699.
2.
Fig. 3

Fig. 3. From: Parameters that effect spine biomechanics following cervical disc replacement.

Finite element model based C4–C5 level motion for the intact spine and the spines implanted with the three disc designs of artificial discs under 75 N compression + 1.5 Nm moment

Vijay K. Goel, et al. Eur Spine J. 2012 June;21(Suppl 5):688-699.
3.
Fig. 4

Fig. 4. From: Parameters that effect spine biomechanics following cervical disc replacement.

a The linear wear contour for Disc Only and Disc + FSU at 1,3,5,7 and 10 million cycles as per ISO18192 (Flexion/Extension (Flex/Ext) of ±7.5°, lateral bending (LB) of ±6°, and axial rotation (AR) of ±4° and a compressive-follower load of 50–150 N). Wear contours clearly indicate the circumferential wear pattern for the Disc only test case, while an uneven, one-sided wear pattern is shown for the Disc + FSU test case. Black denotes maximum wear, while orange or red means minimal wear. In the inset, FV1 stands for magnitude of linear wear (mm). b Cumulative volumetric wear (mm3) at the end of each million cycles for Disc only and Disc + FSU model as per ISO18192 (Flexion/Extension (Flex/Ext)) of ±7.5°; lateral bending (LB) of ±6°, axial rotation (AR) of ±4° and a compressive-follower load of 50–150 N)

Vijay K. Goel, et al. Eur Spine J. 2012 June;21(Suppl 5):688-699.
4.
Fig. 1

Fig. 1. From: Parameters that effect spine biomechanics following cervical disc replacement.

An experimentally validated intact ligamentous cervical spine finite element model was modified to simulate various cases. a Synergy 0 degrees (S0), synergy 6 degrees (S6), ball and socket (BS), ball and trough BT) at C5–C6 level; b cross sectional view of four different disc designs: SPH-S; SPH-I; OVL-S; and OVL-I. In the spherical designs (SPH-I and SPH-S), small radius ball component articulated with socket component. In the oval designs (OVL-I and OVL-S), large radius ball component articulated with a non conforming socket component; c Three basic concepts simulated at C4–5 level: the Ball and socket (BS); Sandwich design (SND)—the artificial disc consisted of three components. A polyethylene core was sandwiched between two metallic endplates, and the elastomeric (ELST) artificial disc was made of silicon with a flap attached to it. The flap was the replacement of anterior longitudinal d Bi-level disc implants at C4–C5 and C5–C6 levels. Compared to Case1, discs in others are moved slightly to the left or right and e models of Disc alone and Disc placed in a cervical segment (Disc + FSU) for wear analysis

Vijay K. Goel, et al. Eur Spine J. 2012 June;21(Suppl 5):688-699.

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