We are sorry, but NCBI web applications do not support your browser and may not function properly. More information

Results: 5

1.
Fig. 4.

Fig. 4. From: Histopathologic Diagnosis of Fungal Infections in the 21st Century.

Diagnostic pitfalls. When using GMS stains, normal tissue structures can appear as yeasts or hyphae. (A) Neurosecretory granules (arrow). (B) Collagen fibers, with one even showing a “pseudoseptum” (arrow). (C) In specimens with few organisms, hyphae cut transversally can appear as yeasts that may have “pseudobudding” (arrows).

Jeannette Guarner, et al. Clin Microbiol Rev. 2011 April;24(2):247-280.
2.
Fig. 2.

Fig. 2. From: Histopathologic Diagnosis of Fungal Infections in the 21st Century.

Morphology, description, diagnosis, and comment for fungal infections that present with hyphae or pseudohyphae in tissues. All photographs are of Grocott methenamine silver (GMS)-stained specimens except for the inset in the fourth row, which is a Fontana-Masson stain. The brown color observed in the fungal element is melanin. For each type of infection, alternative testing and correlation with culture, epidemiologic, and clinical features are necessary. (The photograph in the fourth row is reprinted from the CDC Public Health Image Library collection.)

Jeannette Guarner, et al. Clin Microbiol Rev. 2011 April;24(2):247-280.
3.
Fig. 1.

Fig. 1. From: Histopathologic Diagnosis of Fungal Infections in the 21st Century.

Morphology, description, diagnosis, and comment for endemic fungal infections that present as yeasts in tissues. All photographs are of Grocott methenamine silver (GMS)-stained specimens except for the inset in the second row, which is a mucicarmine stain. For each type of infection, alternative testing and correlation with culture, epidemiologic, and clinical features are necessary. (The photographs of Cryptococcus spp., Histoplasma capsulatum, and Coccidioides spp. are reprinted from the CDC Public Health Image Library collection.)

Jeannette Guarner, et al. Clin Microbiol Rev. 2011 April;24(2):247-280.
4.
Fig. 3.

Fig. 3. From: Histopathologic Diagnosis of Fungal Infections in the 21st Century.

Morphology, description, diagnosis, and comment for fungal infections that show characteristic yeast morphology in tissues. Except for the last row, which shows an H&E-stained asteroid body, all photographs are of Grocott methenamine silver (GMS)-stained specimens (including the inset of S. schenckii, which is counterstained with H&E). For each type of infection, alternative testing and correlation with culture, epidemiologic, and clinical features are necessary. (The photographs of Pneumocystis, Penicillium marneffei, and Paracoccidioides brasiliensis are reprinted from the CDC Public Health Image Library collection.)

Jeannette Guarner, et al. Clin Microbiol Rev. 2011 April;24(2):247-280.
5.
Fig. 5.

Fig. 5. From: Histopathologic Diagnosis of Fungal Infections in the 21st Century.

Sequential specimens stained with GMS (magnification, ×120) showing mold infections in a neutropenic patient with chronic lymphocytic leukemia. (A and B) Hyaline septated hyphae in the lung. The culture was positive for Aspergillus fumigatus. (C) Hyphae (by culture a Fusarium sp.) in a nasal debridement sample obtained in the same patient 3 days after the lung biopsy. The morphology of fungal elements could be confused with mucormycosis, since there are few septations and the hyphae twist and turn. (D) Hyaline pauciseptated hyphae in a lung specimen obtained at autopsy 22 days after the nasal debridement. The specimen stained positive using immunohistochemistry for mucormycosis. The morphology of the hyphae is distorted, probably due to previous antifungal treatment.

Jeannette Guarner, et al. Clin Microbiol Rev. 2011 April;24(2):247-280.

Supplemental Content

Recent activity

Your browsing activity is empty.

Activity recording is turned off.

Turn recording back on

See more...
Write to the Help Desk