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1.
Fig. 4

Fig. 4. From: Optofluidic waveguides: I. Concepts and implementations.

LC-ARROW loss versus wavelength for FRET filter design featuring high loss at donor excitation wavelength and low loss at donor and acceptor emission wavelengths

Holger Schmidt, et al. Microfluid Nanofluidics. ;4(1-2):3-16.
2.
Fig. 5

Fig. 5. From: Optofluidic waveguides: I. Concepts and implementations.

Scanning electrom microscope (left) and mode (right) images of LC-ARROW waveguides. a Rectangular core (Yin et al. 2004), b pre-etched substrate (Yin et al. 2005a), c arch-shaped core (Yin et al. 2005b)

Holger Schmidt, et al. Microfluid Nanofluidics. ;4(1-2):3-16.
3.
Fig. 6

Fig. 6. From: Optofluidic waveguides: I. Concepts and implementations.

Fluorescence detection in linear, open-ended LC-ARROWs. a Experimental beam geometry of molecular excitation (top view λP: excitation beam, λF: fluorescence signal); b detected fluorescence power versus Alexa 647 dye concentration (symbols data, dashed line linear fit)

Holger Schmidt, et al. Microfluid Nanofluidics. ;4(1-2):3-16.
4.
Fig. 7

Fig. 7. From: Optofluidic waveguides: I. Concepts and implementations.

SERS detection in open-ended LC-ARROW with fluidic reservoir. a Experimental beam geometry of excitation of rhodamine 6G molecules bound to silver nanoparticles (top view λP: excitation beam, λR: Raman signals); b R6G concentration-dependent SERS intensities for three representative Raman peaks P1P3, inset spectra at various excitation powers

Holger Schmidt, et al. Microfluid Nanofluidics. ;4(1-2):3-16.
5.
Fig. 8

Fig. 8. From: Optofluidic waveguides: I. Concepts and implementations.

Single molecule fluorescence detection in open-ended LC-ARROW intersection. a Experimental beam geometry of dye molecule in sub-picoliter excitation volume (gray ellipse) (top view λP: excitation beam, λF: fluorescence signal); b fluorescence signal as function of molecules in excitation volume; symbols different experimental runs, dashed line linear fit

Holger Schmidt, et al. Microfluid Nanofluidics. ;4(1-2):3-16.
6.
Fig. 1

Fig. 1. From: Optofluidic waveguides: I. Concepts and implementations.

Total internal reflection (TIR) based waveguides. a TIR principle in slab waveguide, b cross section of solid core ridge waveguide with mode area (ellipse) and penetration area into surrounding liquid (hatched areas); c liquid-core waveguide (LCW) cross section, d nanoporous cladding waveguide (side view), e liquid-liquid core (L2) waveguide (cross section); f slot waveguide (cross section)

Holger Schmidt, et al. Microfluid Nanofluidics. ;4(1-2):3-16.
7.
Fig. 3

Fig. 3. From: Optofluidic waveguides: I. Concepts and implementations.

Dispersion relation for LC-ARROW for TE (right half) and TM (left half) waves. Dark areas propagation forbidden (band gaps), light areas: propagation allowed; white solid lines: light lines; horizontal dash-dotted line: design wavelength (690 nm); dashed arrows: fundamental mode propagation along liquid core; solid arrow: reflection at normal incidence

Holger Schmidt, et al. Microfluid Nanofluidics. ;4(1-2):3-16.
8.
Fig. 2

Fig. 2. From: Optofluidic waveguides: I. Concepts and implementations.

Interference-based waveguides. a Schematic view of multiple interfering partial reflections from periodic dielectric multilayer stack (period Λ), b Bragg waveguide (side view), c Bragg fiber (cross section), d hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (HCPCF, cross section), e 2D planar photonic crystal (top view), f ARROW waveguide principle (side view), g liquid-core (LC) ARROW waveguide (cross section)

Holger Schmidt, et al. Microfluid Nanofluidics. ;4(1-2):3-16.
9.
Fig. 9

Fig. 9. From: Optofluidic waveguides: I. Concepts and implementations.

Electrically controlled fluorescence detection in LC-ARROW optofluidic chip. a Experimental beam geometry of dye molecule moving in electric field towards optical excitation volume (gray ellipse) (top view λP: excitation beam); b applied voltage (top) and detected fluorescence signal (bottom) as function of time, inset details of initial time period showing delay between electrical and optical signal

Holger Schmidt, et al. Microfluid Nanofluidics. ;4(1-2):3-16.
10.
Fig. 10

Fig. 10. From: Optofluidic waveguides: I. Concepts and implementations.

Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) of single biological nanoparticles in LC-ARROW optofluidic chip. a 3D view of optical excitation in waveguide intersection showing excited and non-excited molecules; b normalized FCS correlation signal versus time delay, from left to right Alexa 647 dye molecules (squares), labeled liposomes under 180 V bias (triangles), labeled liposomes without bias (circles); lines theory

Holger Schmidt, et al. Microfluid Nanofluidics. ;4(1-2):3-16.

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