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Results: 6

1.
Fig. 1

Fig. 1. From: Fast nonlinear spectral microscopy of in vivo human skin.

Left, diagram of the nonlinear spectral imaging system. Right, diagram of the spectral data recording on the EMCCD chip.

Arjen N. Bader, et al. Biomed Opt Express. 2011 February 1;2(2):365-373.
2.
Fig. 5

Fig. 5. From: Fast nonlinear spectral microscopy of in vivo human skin.

Nonlinear spectral imaging of the epidermal / dermal junction of three volunteers with Caucasian skin. The images are 224 × 224 pixels, corresponding to 70 × 70 µm2. Excitation power is 15-20 mW, acquisition time is 128 µs per pixel (6.5 s per image) and excitation wavelength is 760 nm.

Arjen N. Bader, et al. Biomed Opt Express. 2011 February 1;2(2):365-373.
3.
Fig. 3

Fig. 3. From: Fast nonlinear spectral microscopy of in vivo human skin.

3D nonlinear spectral imaging of in vivo human skin (Caucasian skin type). Background corrected real color RGB images are shown. XY images are 224 × 224 pixels, corresponding to 70 × 70 µm2; imaging depth is 40 µm. Excitation power is 15 mW, acquisition time is 128 µs per pixel (6,5 s per image), and excitation wavelength is 760 nm.

Arjen N. Bader, et al. Biomed Opt Express. 2011 February 1;2(2):365-373.
4.
Fig. 2

Fig. 2. From: Fast nonlinear spectral microscopy of in vivo human skin.

Effect of simultaneous background recording on the quality of the spectral image of in vivo Caucasian human skin. (Left) Individual intensity and real color RGB images of the three spectra that are recorded for each pixel (row1 = background, row2 = emission spectrum, row3 = background). (Top right) Spectra averaged over the ROI (see white rectangle). (Right bottom) Background corrected intensity and real color RGB image. XY images are 224 × 224 pixels, corresponding to 70 × 70 µm; image depth is 40 µm. Excitation power is 15 mW, acquisition time is 128 µs per pixel (6,5 s per image), and excitation wavelength is 760 nm.

Arjen N. Bader, et al. Biomed Opt Express. 2011 February 1;2(2):365-373.
5.
Fig. 4

Fig. 4. From: Fast nonlinear spectral microscopy of in vivo human skin.

Nonlinear spectral imaging of the epidermal / dermal junction of Caucasian (red lines) and Asian (blue lines) skin. In the background corrected real color RGB images, ROIs are indicated by white squares; EC = epidermal cells, mEC = melanized epidermal cells, C = collagen fibers and E = elastic fibers. For these ROIs, the average spectra are shown on the right, where the red line indicates Caucasian skin and the blue line Asian skin (gray line is the spectrum of nonmelanized EC, added for comparison). The images are 224 × 224 pixels, corresponding to 70 × 70 µm2. Excitation power is 15 mW, acquisition time is 128 µs per pixel (6,5 s per image) and excitation wavelength is 760 nm.

Arjen N. Bader, et al. Biomed Opt Express. 2011 February 1;2(2):365-373.
6.
Fig. 6

Fig. 6. From: Fast nonlinear spectral microscopy of in vivo human skin.

(Top) Effect of spectral averaging on the quality of real color RGB images. For each pixel, the spectrum is averaged over N = 1 (blue area and spectrum), N = 9 (red) or 25 pixels (green); the intensity is not averaged, see text. (Center) RGB images of Asian human skin (same as Fig. 4) for the three levels of averaging. The RGB colors on the vertical white lines are horizontally extended in the bars left of the images. (Bottom) Ternary plots displaying the relative R, G, and B contributions in the pixels of five ROIs (indicated by white boxes in the RGB image): EC = epidermal cells (light blue), pmEC = partly melanized epidermal cells (light green), mEC = melanized epidermal cells (dark green), E = elastic fibers (orange) and C = collagen fibers (violet).

Arjen N. Bader, et al. Biomed Opt Express. 2011 February 1;2(2):365-373.

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