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Results: 5

1.
Fig. 1

Fig. 1. From: Images of photoreceptors in living primate eyes using adaptive optics two-photon ophthalmoscopy.

Schematic of the FAOSLO system. Changes in the vertical plane are outlined by the dashed lines. Inset: A plot of the transmission spectrum for two-photon emission collection into the detector. DM, deformable mirror; HS, horizontal scanner; LD, laser diode; PMT, photomultiplier tube; SLD, superluminescent diode; VS, vertical scanner; WFS, wavefront sensor.

Jennifer J. Hunter, et al. Biomed Opt Express. 2011 January 1;2(1):139-148.
2.
Fig. 5

Fig. 5. From: Images of photoreceptors in living primate eyes using adaptive optics two-photon ophthalmoscopy.

Fluorescence emission response during photoreceptor bleaching. The results for three different retinal locations are shown. Data points are the means of 2 s time intervals and error bars represent the standard error of the means. Lines represent the best fits to the unbinned data.

Jennifer J. Hunter, et al. Biomed Opt Express. 2011 January 1;2(1):139-148.
3.
Fig. 3

Fig. 3. From: Images of photoreceptors in living primate eyes using adaptive optics two-photon ophthalmoscopy.

Mean cone spacing with eccentricity verifies that two-photon fluorescence originates from the cone mosaic. Shown are two-photon images of the cone mosaic in the living primate at three eccentricities in superior retina, (a) 5.5°, (b) 9.1° and (c) 13°. Scale bars, 50 μm. Cone spacing, as determined in Fourier space, is shown as a function of eccentricity (d) from two-photon (●) and reflectance (Δ) images. Error bars represent the width of the secondary peak in the Fourier spectra.

Jennifer J. Hunter, et al. Biomed Opt Express. 2011 January 1;2(1):139-148.
4.
Fig. 4

Fig. 4. From: Images of photoreceptors in living primate eyes using adaptive optics two-photon ophthalmoscopy.

Two-photon fluorescence of photoreceptors in macaque macular region imaged ex vivo. Whole mount view of the photoreceptor inner segment mosaic showing large cones interspersed among the much smaller rods in (a) pre-bleached and (b) post-bleached states. These slices were collapsed across a 2.5 μm depth. (c) Digitally reconstructed transverse view of an ‘average’ cone, computed by averaging the data cropped from 18 identical voxels centered on 18 individual cones, in the post-bleached state showing the bright inner segment (IS) and a much dimmer outer segment (OS). Scale bar, 5 μm.

Jennifer J. Hunter, et al. Biomed Opt Express. 2011 January 1;2(1):139-148.
5.
Fig. 2

Fig. 2. From: Images of photoreceptors in living primate eyes using adaptive optics two-photon ophthalmoscopy.

Images of the cone mosaic in the living primate retina. At 2.5° superior, (a) the two-photon image and (b) the reflectance image show good correspondence. The cross correlation coefficient between these images is 0.9. In magnified sections (c) of the larger images, denoted by white rectangles in (a) and (b), the correspondence between individual cones can be observed (white arrows). Black arrows indicate a cone that was not reflecting light but shows a strong fluorescence signal. The images in (c) were low pass filtered to remove frequencies above the diffraction-limit, thereby improving cone visibility. Scale bars, 50 μm. The quadratic nature of the emitted fluorescence as a function of incident excitation power is shown (d). Error bars represent the standard error of the mean gray level among individual frames.

Jennifer J. Hunter, et al. Biomed Opt Express. 2011 January 1;2(1):139-148.

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