Display Settings:

Items per page

Results: 6

1.
Fig. 2

Fig. 2. From: The structural origin of second harmonic generation in fascia.

SHG images of fascia tissue in (a) forward and (b) backward direction. Signal profiles taken along the same lines in forward and backward images (c) longitudinally and (d) transverse to the collagen sheets. Longitudinal and transverse (to the fibrillar axis) intensity profiles were taken along the yellow lines. The boundaries between the collagen sheets are clear in the backward direction.

Maxime Rivard, et al. Biomed Opt Express. 2011 January 1;2(1):26-36.
2.
Fig. 5

Fig. 5. From: The structural origin of second harmonic generation in fascia.

Piezoresponse force microscopy experiment on fascia. a) sample topography, 5μm scan, (b) topography, zoom of (a), and (c) piezoresponse image [of the same area as in (b)] showing the orientation of the piezoelectric tensor. The piezoelectric response in fascia has either a positive or negative value (white or a dark contrast).

Maxime Rivard, et al. Biomed Opt Express. 2011 January 1;2(1):26-36.
3.
Fig. 6

Fig. 6. From: The structural origin of second harmonic generation in fascia.

The dependence of the PFM signal (in-plane measurements) on the angle between the cantilever and the collagen fibril axis, averaged over a 5μm of fibril length. The single collagen fibril was rotated in steps of 15 degrees. The insets illustrate two of the image sets (each composed of topography at left and PFM image at right, 5μm scans) used to construct the graph. The yellow arrows in the PFM images illustrate the detection direction.

Maxime Rivard, et al. Biomed Opt Express. 2011 January 1;2(1):26-36.
4.
Fig. 3

Fig. 3. From: The structural origin of second harmonic generation in fascia.

SHG images of fascia tissue taken with different collection NA by varying the aperture of the collection objective with an iris. Forward signal was collected with (a) 1,15 NA, (b) 0,55 NA, (c) 0,35 NA, (d) 0,19 NA and (e) 0,07 NA. Longitudinal and transversal (to the fibrillar axis) intensity profiles taken in (a-e) along the yellow lines shown in (a) are also presented in (f) and (g). New modulations in the signal appear along those structures when the collection NA used to take the image is smaller than 0.55.

Maxime Rivard, et al. Biomed Opt Express. 2011 January 1;2(1):26-36.
5.
Fig. 1

Fig. 1. From: The structural origin of second harmonic generation in fascia.

Experimental setup used for the SHG experiments: forward and backward SHG imaging microscopy, forward SHG microscopy with a variable collection numerical aperture (iris) and SHG under tight focusing near a quartz interface (radiation pattern measurement). H, half-wave plate; P, polarizer; D, Dichroic mirror; O1, illumination objective (0.8 NA, water); O2, collection objective (1.15 NA, water); F, filters; PMT, photomultiplier tube. In the forward direction, the detector is whether a PMT or a CCD.

Maxime Rivard, et al. Biomed Opt Express. 2011 January 1;2(1):26-36.
6.
Fig. 4

Fig. 4. From: The structural origin of second harmonic generation in fascia.

Experimental signal profiles when (i) the focus travels through (a) the lower and (b) the upper interface of the quartz crystal. When the NA used for collection is reduced, the SHG signal profile becomes asymmetric in Z at both interfaces. Images of the collimated radiation pattern are taken with a CCD camera while the focus is near the upper interface: (c) 6 μm in the crystal, (d) 4 μm in the crystal, (e) 2 μm in the crystal, (f) at the interface, (g) 2 μm in the air, and (h) 4 μm in the air. (j) The radial intensity profile in function of the equivalent NA (which is a measure of the angle of emission). This demonstrates that the position of the focus in the χ(2) distribution can be responsible for changes in the radiation pattern.

Maxime Rivard, et al. Biomed Opt Express. 2011 January 1;2(1):26-36.

Display Settings:

Items per page

Supplemental Content

Recent activity

Your browsing activity is empty.

Activity recording is turned off.

Turn recording back on

See more...
Write to the Help Desk