Results: 4

1.
Fig. 3

Fig. 3. From: Modulating the processing of emotional stimuli by cognitive demand.

Imaging- data for network of the processing of emotional stimuli. Relative to neutral pictures there is increased activation in OFC and dorsal medial prefrontal cortex to emotional (positive/negative) stimuli. (A) Relative to the control condition there is also increased activation of amygdala, BA45 and anterior insula/OFC (B) shown here as a differential contrast across positive and negative pictures at sequence-lengths of four and six items and neutral pictures or rather control condition.

Tanja S. Kellermann, et al. Soc Cogn Affect Neurosci. 2012 March;7(3):263-273.
2.
Fig. 2

Fig. 2. From: Modulating the processing of emotional stimuli by cognitive demand.

Behavioural data as obtained in the scanning session. All pictures from IAPS increased the error-rate relative to the resting control condition at reproducing the shorter sequences (four items). For the influence on the reproduction of the more difficult sequences (six items), we observed differential valence effects: negative pictures increased the error-rate relative to the control condition, positive ones decreased the error-rate and neutral ones had an identical error-rate compared with the control condition.

Tanja S. Kellermann, et al. Soc Cogn Affect Neurosci. 2012 March;7(3):263-273.
3.
Fig. 1

Fig. 1. From: Modulating the processing of emotional stimuli by cognitive demand.

Time line of the experimental trials. Each trial began with the presentation of a schematized left or right hand for 1 s. Subsequently, visual cues (red dots on the fingers) indicating either a four (easy condition) or a six (difficult condition) item, i.e. fingers, was presented for 250 ms each. Following the demonstration of the sequence, a blank screen was presented for a uniformly jittered delay lasting between 6.5 and 7.5 s. After that one of the 72 emotional pictures from the IAPS or a control stimulus (green dot) was presented for 1 s. The subjects’ task was to reproduce the sequence they had been shown as fast and correctly as possible by button presses. Following the response there was a variable (7–11 s) inter-trial interval during which a blank screen was shown.

Tanja S. Kellermann, et al. Soc Cogn Affect Neurosci. 2012 March;7(3):263-273.
4.
Fig. 4

Fig. 4. From: Modulating the processing of emotional stimuli by cognitive demand.

Imaging- data for modulating the emotional processing by cognitive demand. (A) In comparison to the easy task (Emo4: positive and negative pictures at sequence-lengths of four items) the more difficult task (Emo6: positive and negative pictures at sequence-lengths of six items) evoked stronger activation in the superior parietal lobe and the premotor cortex, known to be involved in motor planning and attention. A detailed description of the clusters (referenced according to the labels in this figure), including local maxima coordinates and cytoarchitectonic substrates, is given in Table 3. (B) The suppression of the processing of emotional stimuli is identified by an interaction between stimulus content and cognitive load (emotional pictures during easy task > emotional pictures during difficult task) > (neutral pictures during easy task > neutral pictures during difficult task). At concurrently execution of the difficult task, amygdala and OFC are activated significantly less by emotional stimuli (B).

Tanja S. Kellermann, et al. Soc Cogn Affect Neurosci. 2012 March;7(3):263-273.

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