Results: 4

1.
Figure 1

Figure 1. From: Staying Cool when Things Get Hot: Emotion Regulation Modulates Neural Mechanisms of Memory Encoding.

Study protocol. Subjects viewed pictures for 2 s, after which the regulation instruction was superimposed on the picture with 50% transparency for 2 s. Participants viewed the regulation strategy only for an additional 6 s. They were instructed to make a valence and confidence judgment regarding their success in implementing the strategy correctly. The symbols used were an eye for “view,” a refresh sign for “reappraise,” and an X for “suppress.”

Jasmeet Pannu Hayes, et al. Front Hum Neurosci. 2010;4:230.
2.
Figure 2

Figure 2. From: Staying Cool when Things Get Hot: Emotion Regulation Modulates Neural Mechanisms of Memory Encoding.

Behavioral results. (A) Valence ratings for each condition. Higher numbers on the scale indicate more positive valence ratings. Participants had the highest valence ratings for the neutral condition. Within negative picture viewing, participants had significantly higher valence ratings after reappraising pictures relative to suppressing or viewing. (B) Subsequent memory performance showed greatest retention for reappraised pictures than the other conditions. Error bars represent standard error of the mean.

Jasmeet Pannu Hayes, et al. Front Hum Neurosci. 2010;4:230.
3.
Figure 4

Figure 4. From: Staying Cool when Things Get Hot: Emotion Regulation Modulates Neural Mechanisms of Memory Encoding.

Subsequent memory due to memory (Dm) correlations between prefrontal and medial temporal lobe regions-of-interest (ROI) as a function of regulation strategy. (A) Stronger right amygdala–hippocampal correlation for the reappraise and view conditions than for suppress. (B) Stronger LIFG–right hippocampal correlation for the reappraise condition than for view and suppress. (C) Percent signal changes for each condition and ROI, collapsed across memory. R = right hemisphere, Dm = difference due to memory, LIFG = left inferior frontal gyrus.

Jasmeet Pannu Hayes, et al. Front Hum Neurosci. 2010;4:230.
4.
Figure 3

Figure 3. From: Staying Cool when Things Get Hot: Emotion Regulation Modulates Neural Mechanisms of Memory Encoding.

fMRI results for each negative emotion regulation condition. Top row: Passively viewing negative pictures yielded more bilateral amygdala activity than either reappraise (A) or suppress (B), and greater bilateral insula activity than reappraise (A). Middle row: Frontal cortex increases during reappraisal included (C) greater bilateral inferior frontal gyrus and paracingulate gyrus activity than passive viewing, and (D) greater left inferior frontal gyrus and frontal polar responses than during suppression. Bottom row: Suppression engaged bilateral insula relative to both passive viewing and reappraisal, with additional supramarginal gyrus recruitment relative to passive viewing (E) and somatosensory cortex recruitment relative to reappraisal (F).

Jasmeet Pannu Hayes, et al. Front Hum Neurosci. 2010;4:230.

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