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Results: 3

1.
Figure 2

Figure 2. From: Effects of inosine on reperfusion injury after cardiopulmonary bypass.

The effect of inosine on diastolic cardiac function. Time constant of lerft ventricle decay (Tau) (A) and left ventricle end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP) (B) are shown in control and inosine-treated dogs. All values are given as mean ± SEM, *p < 0.05 vs. control, °p < 0.05 vs. before CPB.

Gábor Veres, et al. J Cardiothorac Surg. 2010;5:106-106.
2.
Figure 1

Figure 1. From: Effects of inosine on reperfusion injury after cardiopulmonary bypass.

The effect of inosine on left ventricular contractility. The slope (Ees) of left ventricular end-systolic pressure-volume relationships (A) and preload recruitable stroke work (PRSW) (B) are shown in control and inosine-treated dogs. All values are given as mean ± SEM, *p < 0.05 vs. control, °p < 0.05 vs. before CPB.

Gábor Veres, et al. J Cardiothorac Surg. 2010;5:106-106.
3.
Figure 3

Figure 3. From: Effects of inosine on reperfusion injury after cardiopulmonary bypass.

Coronary endothelial function in vivo. Coronary blood flow (CBF) before and after 60 minutes of reperfusion (A). Endothelium-dependent vasodilatation after intracoronary administration of a single bolus of acetylcholine (10-7 mol) expressed as percent change of coronary blood flow before and after cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) at 60 min of reperfusion (B). All values are given as mean ± SEM; °p < 0.05 versus before CPB, *p < 0.05 versus control.

Gábor Veres, et al. J Cardiothorac Surg. 2010;5:106-106.

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