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Results: 5

1.
Fig. 4.

Fig. 4. From: Electrical detection of pathogenic bacteria via immobilized antimicrobial peptides.

Impedance spectroscopy of the selectivity of AMPs. (A) Impedance spectra of the AMP-functionalized microelectrode array after interaction with various bacterial samples (107 cfu/mL). (B) Impedance changes associated with various bacterial species at 10 Hz. Error bars show standard deviation (N = 3).

Manu S. Mannoor, et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2010 November 9;107(45):19207-19212.
2.
Fig. 2.

Fig. 2. From: Electrical detection of pathogenic bacteria via immobilized antimicrobial peptides.

Sensitivity of the AMP electronic biosensor. (A) Impedance spectra of various concentrations of E. coli O157∶H7 cells (red), of a nonlabeled sensor (blue), and of a sensor with an N-terminal immobilized AMP (purple). (B) Impedance spectra of various concentrations of E. coli with the AMP sensor at 10 Hz. Error bars show standard deviation (N = 3).

Manu S. Mannoor, et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2010 November 9;107(45):19207-19212.
3.
Fig. 3.

Fig. 3. From: Electrical detection of pathogenic bacteria via immobilized antimicrobial peptides.

Optical microscopy of the selectivity of AMPs. (Left) Demonstration of selective binding of the immobilized AMP to various stained bacterial cells (107 cfu/mL), including (A) E. coli O157∶H7, (B) S. typhimurium, (C) E. coli ATCC 35218, and (D) L. monocytogenes. (Right) The corresponding surface density of the bound cells. Scale bars are 10 μm.

Manu S. Mannoor, et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2010 November 9;107(45):19207-19212.
4.
Fig. 1.

Fig. 1. From: Electrical detection of pathogenic bacteria via immobilized antimicrobial peptides.

AMP-based electrical detection of bacteria. (A) Schematic of AMPs immobilized on an interdigitated microelectrode array. (B) Magnified image of the AMP magainin I in helical form, modified with a terminal cysteine residue, and with clearly defined hydrophobic and hydrophilic faces. (C) Detection of bacteria is achieved via binding of target cells to the immobilized AMPs. (D) Optical image of the interdigitated microelectrode array (scale bar: 50 μm).

Manu S. Mannoor, et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2010 November 9;107(45):19207-19212.
5.
Fig. 5.

Fig. 5. From: Electrical detection of pathogenic bacteria via immobilized antimicrobial peptides.

Real-time binding of bacteria to AMP biosensors. (A) Digital photograph of the microfluidic flow cell. (B) Optical micrograph of the microfluidic channel with an embedded interdigitated microelectrode array chip. (C) Optical image of the embedded microelectrode array after exposure to 107 cfu/mL bacterial cells for 30 min. (D) Real-time monitoring of the interaction of the AMP-functionalized sensor (and an unlabeled control chip) with various concentrations of E. coli cells.

Manu S. Mannoor, et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2010 November 9;107(45):19207-19212.

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