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Results: 11

1.
Fig. 3

Fig. 3. From: A functionalizable reverse thermal gel based on a polyurethane/PEG block copolymer.

1H FTNMR spectra of ESHU in CDCl3. The presence of a, e and g protons indicate the presence of PEG, polyurethane and BOC-protected amine groups in ESHU.

Daewon Park, et al. Biomaterials. ;32(3):777-786.
2.
Fig. 9

Fig. 9. From: A functionalizable reverse thermal gel based on a polyurethane/PEG block copolymer.

FTIR spectra of (A) NH2-ESHU and (B) IKVAVS-ESHU. The carbonyl groups of the peptide bonds in IKVAVS-ESHU was observed at 1630 cm−1 (*) after IKVAVS incorporation.

Daewon Park, et al. Biomaterials. ;32(3):777-786.
3.
Fig. 1

Fig. 1. From: A functionalizable reverse thermal gel based on a polyurethane/PEG block copolymer.

Synthesis of ESHU. Step 1: synthesis of polyurethane intermediate I. Step 2: PEGylation of intermediate I to obtain ESHU. BOC: tert-Butyl carbamate protecting group; HDI: hexamethylene diisocyanate.

Daewon Park, et al. Biomaterials. ;32(3):777-786.
4.
Fig. 5

Fig. 5. From: A functionalizable reverse thermal gel based on a polyurethane/PEG block copolymer.

In vitro degradation of ESHU in PBS and CE solution. The degradation of ESHU was much faster in the presence of CE. Data are presented as means ± S.D (n=3).

Daewon Park, et al. Biomaterials. ;32(3):777-786.
5.
Fig. 2

Fig. 2. From: A functionalizable reverse thermal gel based on a polyurethane/PEG block copolymer.

FTIR spectra of (A) intermediate I and (B) ESHU. The reactive isocyanate groups of intermediate I at 2250 cm−1 (*) completely disappeared while ether linkage corresponding to PEG in ESHU at 1100cm−1 (#) appeared after the PEGylation.

Daewon Park, et al. Biomaterials. ;32(3):777-786.
6.
Fig. 10

Fig. 10. From: A functionalizable reverse thermal gel based on a polyurethane/PEG block copolymer.

1H FTNMR spectra of IKVAVS-ESHU in D2O. The incorporation of IKVAVS was confirmed by appearance of new peaks between 0.8–2.2 ppm. The presence of a, b, c, d, and e protons indicates the presence of Ile, Lys, Ala, Ser, and Val, respectively. The methylene protons of ESHU backbone was marked as “f” (same as proton “f” in Fig 3).

Daewon Park, et al. Biomaterials. ;32(3):777-786.
7.
Fig. 11

Fig. 11. From: A functionalizable reverse thermal gel based on a polyurethane/PEG block copolymer.

The elastic modulus of IKVAVS-ESHU. (A) Temperature sweep was recorded in the temperature range of 25–45°C (0.5°C/min) at concentrations of 15% (wt). The polymer solution showed rapid change of elastic modulus upon heating and gelled completely at 37°C. (B) Time sweep was recorded at 37°C at concentrations of 15% (wt) for 3min. The polymer solution became a gel in less than a minute.

Daewon Park, et al. Biomaterials. ;32(3):777-786.
8.
Fig. 8

Fig. 8. From: A functionalizable reverse thermal gel based on a polyurethane/PEG block copolymer.

Representative photomicrographs (200×, scale bar = 60 μm) of injection sites immunohistochemically stained for ED1+ macrophages. Tissues were harvested after: (A) 3 days; (B) 14 days, and (C) 28 days. (D) The number of ED1+ macrophages decreased with time indicating a reduction in inflammatory response. Images from 5 random areas around the injection sites were used for quantification at each time point. Data represent mean±SD (n=5). ** p<0.01.

Daewon Park, et al. Biomaterials. ;32(3):777-786.
9.
Fig. 4

Fig. 4. From: A functionalizable reverse thermal gel based on a polyurethane/PEG block copolymer.

The elastic modulus of ESHU. (A) Temperature sweep was recorded in the temperature range of 25–45°C (0.5°C/min) at concentrations of 20 and 30% (wt). (B) Time sweep was recorded at 37°C at concentrations of 20 and 30% (wt) for 15 min. The rapid change of elastic modulus upon heating indicated a sol to gel phase transition. The decrease in elastic modulus caused by further heating beyond gelation indicated phase separation. The polymer solution formed a gel in 3 min at 37°C.

Daewon Park, et al. Biomaterials. ;32(3):777-786.
10.
Fig. 6

Fig. 6. From: A functionalizable reverse thermal gel based on a polyurethane/PEG block copolymer.

In vitro cytotoxicity of ESHU toward baboon smooth muscle cells by MCDB extracts for 24 h at 37°C. Phase contrast of cell morphologies of control (A) and extract (B). No differences were observed between control and extract. Fluorescence images of cells of (C) control and (D) extract which stained with LIVE/DEAD assay reagent. All images produced mostly green fluorescence with a few red one. All images were taken with 200× magnification. (E) The percentage of live cells by LIVE/DEAD assay. Data are presented as mean±S.D (n=3).

Daewon Park, et al. Biomaterials. ;32(3):777-786.
11.
Fig. 7

Fig. 7. From: A functionalizable reverse thermal gel based on a polyurethane/PEG block copolymer.

Photomicrographs of H&E and MTS stained sections of the tissues adjacent to ESHU injection site (marked by ***). The tissues were harvested after: 3 days (A, D, and G), 14 days (B, E, and H), and 28 days (C, F, and I). (A–C) Low magnification of images (40x, scale bar = 500 μm) of H&E stained tissue, rectangle frames indicated the field chosen for capture at higher magnifications. (D–F) H&E staining of the injection sites indicated a rapid decrease in inflammatory infiltrates over time. (200×, scale bar = 100 μm); (G–I) MTS staining of the injection site indicated collagen deposition (200×, scale bar = 100 μm).

Daewon Park, et al. Biomaterials. ;32(3):777-786.

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