Results: 5

1.
Figure 2

Figure 2. From: Conservation, duplication, and loss of the Tor signaling pathway in the fungal kingdom.

Tor protein architecture. Tor protein domain architecture is highly conserved throughout the fungal kingdom. The N-terminal HEAT repeats (blue), the FAT (green) and the FATC (purple) domains participate in protein-protein scaffolding thereby facilitating complex interactions. The FRB domain (yellow) is a highly conserved 100 amino acid sequence necessary for rapamycin interaction. The kinase domain (orange) phosphorylates protein substrates.

Cecelia A Shertz, et al. BMC Genomics. 2010;11:510-510.
2.
Figure 1

Figure 1. From: Conservation, duplication, and loss of the Tor signaling pathway in the fungal kingdom.

The Tor pathway in the model fungi Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe. The Tor pathway components investigated in this study in S. cerevisiae (A) and S. pombe (B) are included in this figure. Functional homologs between the two species are indicated in the same shape and color. Sch9, Ypk1, and Gad8 are AGC kinases that are Tor- and PDK-regulated.

Cecelia A Shertz, et al. BMC Genomics. 2010;11:510-510.
3.
Figure 5

Figure 5. From: Conservation, duplication, and loss of the Tor signaling pathway in the fungal kingdom.

Synteny analysis of TOR paralogs. Synteny analysis supports the hypothesis that the Tor paralogs in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (A) resulted from a whole genome duplication event, while in Schizosaccharomyces pombe (B) and Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (C) two Tor paralogs result from independent segmental gene duplication events, and there is no syntenic conservation in the surrounding sequence. Red lines indicate syntenic genes oriented in the same direction whereas blue lines indicate syntenic genes oriented in the opposite direction (i.e., + strand and - strand).

Cecelia A Shertz, et al. BMC Genomics. 2010;11:510-510.
4.
Figure 4

Figure 4. From: Conservation, duplication, and loss of the Tor signaling pathway in the fungal kingdom.

TOR gene duplication events. Several independent segmental gene duplications or whole genome duplication events have occurred throughout the fungal kingdom resulting in multiple Tor homologs. A whole genome duplication occurred in the Saccharomyces budding yeast lineage prior to the speciation of the sensu stricto, sensu lato, and related Saccharomycotina species. An independent gene duplication event occurred in the Schizosaccharomyces lineage, resulting in 2 Tor homologs in four Schizosaccharomyces fission yeast species. Independent gene duplication events also occurred in Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis and the edible mushroom Pleurotus ostreatus. Numbers at nodes are bootstrap percentages representing 500 replicates.

Cecelia A Shertz, et al. BMC Genomics. 2010;11:510-510.
5.
Figure 3

Figure 3. From: Conservation, duplication, and loss of the Tor signaling pathway in the fungal kingdom.

The highly conserved FRB domain of Tor. Residues L1971, F1979 and Y2045 are involved in phosphatidic acid binding in mTOR (open arrows). Mutation of S1975 confers rapamycin resistance in mammalian cells, Candida albicans, Cryptococcus neoformans, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Residues W2041 and F2048 are required for interaction with rapamycin. All of these amino acid residues are conserved in the species examined in this study. Abbreviations: Sc = Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Sp = Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Po = Pleurotus ostreatus, Mc = Mucor circinelloides, Ro = Rhizopus oryzae, Pb = Phycomyces blakesleeanus, Bd = Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, Spu = Spizellomyces punctatus.

Cecelia A Shertz, et al. BMC Genomics. 2010;11:510-510.

Supplemental Content

Recent activity

Your browsing activity is empty.

Activity recording is turned off.

Turn recording back on

See more...
Write to the Help Desk