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Results: 3

1.
Fig. 2

Fig. 2. From: Family Background Buys an Education in Minnesota but Not in Sweden.

Variance in educational attainment in Sweden by 2004, as a function of IQ (in standard deviation units) measured at 18 years of age. Results are shown for three sources of variance: genetic (A), shared environmental (C), and nonshared environmental (E) influences.

Wendy Johnson, et al. Psychol Sci. ;21(9):1266-1273.
2.
Fig. 1

Fig. 1. From: Family Background Buys an Education in Minnesota but Not in Sweden.

Diagrammatic model of genetic and environmental influences linking intelligence and educational attainment. In our study we tested genetic (a), shared environmental (c), and nonshared environmental (e) influences. The equations for the paths in the model allow level of intelligence (M) to moderate the genetic or environmental influences on educational attainment. ā€œCā€ refers to influences common to intelligence and education, and ā€œUā€ refers to influences unique to education.

Wendy Johnson, et al. Psychol Sci. ;21(9):1266-1273.
3.
Fig. 3

Fig. 3. From: Family Background Buys an Education in Minnesota but Not in Sweden.

Variance in educational attainment in Minnesota by 24 years of age as a function of IQ (in standard deviation units) measured at 17 years of age. Results are shown for three sources of variance: genetic (A), shared environmental (C), and nonshared environmental (E) influences. We observed less genetic variance in educational attainment across the intelligence range in the MTFS population than in the Swedish population. For example, Table 3 shows that at the mean level of intelligence, genetic variance was .35 in the MTFS group, but .50 in the Swedish group. Genetic variance in educational attainment increased across the range of intelligence in both samples. The increase was steeper in the MTFS population than in the Sweden population: It quadrupled from .16 to .64 across the 4-standard-deviation range of intelligence in the MTFS population, but slightly more than doubled in the Swedish population.

Wendy Johnson, et al. Psychol Sci. ;21(9):1266-1273.

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