Results: 4

1.
Figure 2

Figure 2. From: Sex Bias in Neuroscience and Biomedical Research.

Percent of articles in which some portion of the results was analyzed by sex. Data are presented by discipline for articles that utilized both sexes.

Annaliese K. Beery, et al. Neurosci Biobehav Rev. ;35(3):565-572.
2.
Figure 3

Figure 3. From: Sex Bias in Neuroscience and Biomedical Research.

Species use in animal studies by subject area in 2009. Six fields (general biology, immunology, neuroscience, physiology, pharmacology, and endocrinology) relied on rodents in 80% or more of animal studies.

Annaliese K. Beery, et al. Neurosci Biobehav Rev. ;35(3):565-572.
3.
Figure 1

Figure 1. From: Sex Bias in Neuroscience and Biomedical Research.

Distribution of studies by sex and field in 2009. (A) Percent of articles describing non-human animal research that used male subjects, female subjects, both male and female subjects, or did not specify the sex of the subjects. (B) Percent of articles describing human research in the same categories. The zoology category was excluded because of insufficient use of human subjects in this field to form an accurate estimate.

Annaliese K. Beery, et al. Neurosci Biobehav Rev. ;35(3):565-572.
4.
Figure 4

Figure 4. From: Sex Bias in Neuroscience and Biomedical Research.

Historical change in study sex distribution in animal and human literatures. (A) Combined data from two journals publishing primarily non-human animal research: JPET and J Physiol.. Human studies were excluded from consideration for this graph. (B) Combined data from two clinical journals: JCEM and J Clin Invest. JCEM debuted in 1941. Animal studies were excluded from consideration for this graph. In the both animal and human literatures the number of studies in which sex is not specified has declined, but remains close to 20% in the animal literature. In the human literature there has been an increase in percent of studies of both sexes, not echoed in non-human animal research. Animal studies restricted to males alone have become more common in recent years.

Annaliese K. Beery, et al. Neurosci Biobehav Rev. ;35(3):565-572.

Supplemental Content

Recent activity

Your browsing activity is empty.

Activity recording is turned off.

Turn recording back on

See more...
Write to the Help Desk