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Results: 5

1.
Figure 3

Figure 3. From: Sound localization skills in children who use bilateral cochlear implants and in children with normal acoustic hearing.

Relationship between sound localization accuracy (as quantified by RMS error) and spatial acuity (as quantified by minimum audible angle). CNT: MAA could not be calculated because CIAG did not perform at above chance levels on the maximum angle separation (±70°).

Tina M. Grieco-Calub, et al. Ear Hear. ;31(5):645-656.
2.
Figure 1

Figure 1. From: Sound localization skills in children who use bilateral cochlear implants and in children with normal acoustic hearing.

Individual performance on the sound source identification task in the NH group (A) and the BICI group (B). The size of the dots represents the number of responses for a given target location. Larger dots reflect a greater number of responses. The diagonal line represents perfect performance. Letters in the parentheses indicate the subgroup that each child in the BICI group belongs to based on performance.

Tina M. Grieco-Calub, et al. Ear Hear. ;31(5):645-656.
3.
Figure 4

Figure 4. From: Sound localization skills in children who use bilateral cochlear implants and in children with normal acoustic hearing.

Individual performance of the BICI group on the sound source identification task (as quantified by RMS error) when using a single CI (squares). Data from the bilateral condition (circles, from Figure 2B) are plotted for comparison. Data are plotted along the x-axis similarly as in Figure 2B. Letters in the parentheses indicate the subgroup that each child in the BICI group belongs to based on performance. The diamond symbols represent the two children who were tested with the noise stimulus. The dotted line represents chance performance for the 7-AFC task and the dashed line represents chance performance for the 15-AFC task.

Tina M. Grieco-Calub, et al. Ear Hear. ;31(5):645-656.
4.
Figure 2

Figure 2. From: Sound localization skills in children who use bilateral cochlear implants and in children with normal acoustic hearing.

Individual performance on the sound source identification task (as quantified by RMS error) for the NH group (A) and the BICI group when using both implants (B). In both panels, data are plotted along the x-axis from small RMS errors (better performance) to large RMS errors (i.e., poorer performance). Letters in the parentheses indicate the subgroup that each child in the BICI group belongs to based on performance. The gray diamonds represent the two children who were tested with the noise stimulus. The dotted line represents chance performance for the 7-AFC task and the dashed line represents chance performance for the 15-AFC task.

Tina M. Grieco-Calub, et al. Ear Hear. ;31(5):645-656.
5.
Figure 5

Figure 5. From: Sound localization skills in children who use bilateral cochlear implants and in children with normal acoustic hearing.

Changes in sound localization abilities in children after 7–21 months of bilateral experience. RMS errors under the bilateral listening condition (circles) and the unilateral listening condition with the first CI (squares), as well as minimum audible angle (MAA) under the bilateral listening condition (triangles) are illustrated for 11 children who participated in the task on two sequential visits. Three groups of children emerged: children who had RMS errors of >50° in the bilateral condition at visits 1 and 2 (top row), children who had and improvement of10° or more in sound source identification between visits 1 and 2 (middle row), and children who RMS errors of ≤30° in the bilateral condition at visits 1 and 2 (bottom row).

Tina M. Grieco-Calub, et al. Ear Hear. ;31(5):645-656.

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