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Results: 4

1.
Fig. 4

Fig. 4. From: Hereditary Colon Cancer: Lynch Syndrome.

Diagnostic algorithm for Lynch syndrome using genetic testing.

Eunjeong Jang, et al. Gut Liver. 2010 June;4(2):151-160.
2.
Fig. 2

Fig. 2. From: Hereditary Colon Cancer: Lynch Syndrome.

Inherited syndromes with an increased risk of colorectal cancer.
CHRPE, congenital hypertrophy of the retinal pigmented epithelium.

Eunjeong Jang, et al. Gut Liver. 2010 June;4(2):151-160.
3.
Fig. 1

Fig. 1. From: Hereditary Colon Cancer: Lynch Syndrome.

Age-standardized mortalities from colon cancer in USA, Japan and Korea. The Age-standardized mortalities from colon cancer in the USA show decreases since the mid 1980's in both sexes. In Japan, there have also been decreases in mortality from colon cancer since the mid 1990's. However, rates are continuing to increase in South Korea (Base line data from Ref. 42).

Eunjeong Jang, et al. Gut Liver. 2010 June;4(2):151-160.
4.
Fig. 3

Fig. 3. From: Hereditary Colon Cancer: Lynch Syndrome.

Schematic view of DNA Mismatch-repair pathway.43 The heterodimer of hMSH2 and hMSH6 (also known as hMutSα) recognizes single nucleotide mispairs and binds to DNA as a sliding clamp. The heterodimer of hMLH1 and hPMS2 (also known as hMutLα) then binds to hMutSα to guide an exonuclease to remove several bases from the newly synthesized DNA strand, with subsequent re-synthesis of DNA with the correct base pairing. When the MutS complexes bind DNA, they exchange ADP for ATP. For the MMR proteins to be released from DNA, ATP is hydrolyzed to ADP (Reprinted from Gastroenterology 2008;136:1083, with permission).

Eunjeong Jang, et al. Gut Liver. 2010 June;4(2):151-160.

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