Results: 3

1.
Figure 2

Figure 2. From: The natural history of multiple sclerosis, a geographically based study 10: relapses and long-term disability.

Cox regression univariate analysis. Risk (y-axis) of attaining DSS 6 (black), 8 (dark grey) and 10 (light grey) from disease onset according to number of relapses experienced from Year 3 up to onset of progression. Hazard ratios are obtained through comparison with zero relapses. The y-axis expresses the variation of the hazard ratio according to the number of Year 3-secondary progression relapses (x-axis). A larger number of attacks was significantly related to a lower risk and a shorter time to attain the disability endpoints from disease onset. Year 3-secondary progression is period from end of Year 2 to onset of the progressive phase (secondary progression).

Antonio Scalfari, et al. Brain. 2010 July;133(7):1914-1929.
2.
Figure 3

Figure 3. From: The natural history of multiple sclerosis, a geographically based study 10: relapses and long-term disability.

Multiple survival Cox regression analysis. Risk (y-axis) of attaining DSS 6 from disease onset according to the combined effect of number of attacks in Years 1 and 2 (x-axis) and number of attacks from Year 3 up to onset of progression (0–1–2–3) in patients with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis. Hazard ratios are obtained through comparison with zero attacks. The y-axis shows the variation of the hazard ratio obtained by the combined effect of Years 1 and 2 relapses (x-axis) and Year 3-secondary progression relapses (each column) on the time to attain DSS 6 from disease onset. Patients at higher risk of disability have larger number of Years 1 and 2 relapses and smaller number of Year 3-secondary progression relapses. A larger number of attacks after Year 2 reduces the combined risk of attaining disability endpoints.

Antonio Scalfari, et al. Brain. 2010 July;133(7):1914-1929.
3.
Figure 1

Figure 1. From: The natural history of multiple sclerosis, a geographically based study 10: relapses and long-term disability.

Kaplan–Meier survival curves of time from disease onset to DSS 6 in patients grouped according to (A) total number of relapses in Year 1 and Year 2 (1 relapse; 2 relapses; ≥3 relapses). The estimated mean time from disease onset to DSS 6 was significantly shorter in those patients with a larger number of attacks in Years 1 and 2: 1 relapse group = 22.7 mean years, 2 relapses group = 18.7 mean years, ≥3 relapses group = 15.1 mean years. (B) First inter-attack interval (0–2 years; 3–5 years; ≥6 years). The estimated mean time from disease onset to DSS 6 was significantly shorter in those patients with a shorter interval between the first and the second attack. 0–2 years interval group = 18.2 mean years, 3–5 years interval group = 21.0 mean years, ≥6 years interval group=25.9 mean years. (C) Time from onset to moderate disability (DSS 3) (0–2 years; 3–7 years; ≥8 years). The estimated mean time from DSS 3 to DSS 6 was significantly shorter in those patients with a shorter interval between disease onset and moderate disability (DSS 3). 0–2 years interval group = 5.4 mean years, 3–7 years interval group = 7.4 mean years, ≥8 years interval group = 8.7 mean years. (D) total number of relapses before the onset of progression (1–2 relapses; 3–4 relapses; ≥6 relapses). The estimated mean times from disease onset to DSS 6 were remarkably similar in all three groups. 1–2 relapses group = 15.6 mean years, 3–4 relapses group = 15.7 mean years, ≥5 relapses group = 15.9 mean years.

Antonio Scalfari, et al. Brain. 2010 July;133(7):1914-1929.

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