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Results: 2

1.
Figure 2

Figure 2. From: The Accurate Measurement of Fear Memory in Pavlovian Conditioning: Resolving The Baseline Issue.

Common methods of reporting tone fear. (a) Absolute freezing (percentage time spent freezing) averaged over all tone presentations. (b) Freezing ratio of percentage freezing during the CS divided by the sum of percentage freezing during the CS and the percentage freezing during baseline. (c) Subtraction score calculated by subtracting percentage freezing during the 180s baseline period from percentage freezing during the tone. (d) Baseline covariate (adjusted means and standard error from ANCOVA). Open circles, weak tone conditioning groups; closed circles, strong tone conditioning.

Nathan S Jacobs, et al. J Neurosci Methods. ;190(2):235-239.
2.
Figure 1

Figure 1. From: The Accurate Measurement of Fear Memory in Pavlovian Conditioning: Resolving The Baseline Issue.

Percent freezing during the tone test. (a) Experimental design. On Day 1 all animals were trained in Context A (dark boxes) with either 1 (weak) or 3 (strong) tone-shock pairings. Context fear extinction sessions were given in Context A on Days 2–4. No-extinction (NE) groups remained in their homecages for Days 2–5 and were given a tone test on Day 6 with all other groups. All sessions on Day 5 occured in Context B (white boxes), a distinctly different chamber used for the tone test on Day 6, where animals received 1, 2, or 6 unsignaled footshocks (top row, “1, 2, 6 Sh”), were pre-exposed to the context (middle row, “0 Sh”), or were kept in their homecage (bottome row, “NE”). Note that the 0 Sh groups received no aversive foot shocks on Day 5 so these animals were essentially pre-exposed to the testing chamber. (b, c) Percent freezing during the tone test on Day 6. For weak tone conditioning (b), both baseline and tone freezing increased as a function of the number of unsignaled footshocks in the 0, 1, 2, and 6Sh groups. Note that compared to the 0 Sh group, the NE group had higher baseline freezing but equivalent tone freezing. For strong tone conditioning (c), again both baseline and tone freezing increased as a function of the number of unsignaled footshocks given. Note that the NE group had significantly higher baseline freezing and lower tone freezing than the 0Sh group.

Nathan S Jacobs, et al. J Neurosci Methods. ;190(2):235-239.

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