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1.
Figure 2

Figure 2. From: Getting to the root of plant biology: impact of the Arabidopsis genome sequence on root research.

Basic features of arabidopsis root structure.
This series of progressively magnified images comprises an image of 4-day-old Arabidopsis seedlings grown on vertical plates (left), a magnified view of a single seedling illustrating the abundant root hairs (centre), and a fluorescent microscopy image of an Arabidopsis root tip with the epidermis and lateral root cap (lrc) cells expressing GFP (right).

Philip N. Benfey, et al. Plant J. ;61(6):992-1000.
2.
Figure 3

Figure 3. From: Getting to the root of plant biology: impact of the Arabidopsis genome sequence on root research.

Pipeline for profiling mRNA expression in root cell types.
Roots of transgenic lines with cell type-specific GFP expression are subjected to enzymatic digestion of the cell walls. The resulting protoplasts are analysed in a fluorescent activated cell sorter (FACS), which separates the GFP-expressing cells from the non-expressing cells. RNA from the sorted cells is then used for labelling and hybridization to microarrays.

Philip N. Benfey, et al. Plant J. ;61(6):992-1000.
3.
Figure 1

Figure 1. From: Getting to the root of plant biology: impact of the Arabidopsis genome sequence on root research.

Schematic representation of Arabidopsis primary and lateral root tissues.
Single layers of epidermis (red), cortex (green), endodermis (yellow) and pericycle (purple) cells surround the central vascular tissue (grey). The outer layers are organized as concentric cylinders of tissues. Cells within these tissues exhibit a proximal–distal developmental gradient, originating from initial cells abutting quiescent centre cells (light blue) that transit through proximal and distal meristem zones during their division phase, then undergo rapid cell expansion in the elongation zone, prior to entering the differentiation zone. Lateral roots form from the pericyle. As lateral root primordia form (right), all of the tissues found in the primary root are generated de novo.

Philip N. Benfey, et al. Plant J. ;61(6):992-1000.

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