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Results: 2

1.
FIG. 2.

FIG. 2. From: Feasibility of Assessing Liver Lipid by Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy in Healthy Normal and Overweight Prepubertal Children.

IHL was significantly correlated with (upper panel) BMI (r = 0.73, P = 0.016, n = 10), (middle panel) percentage body fat (r = 0.73, P = 0.01, n = 10), and (lower panel) waist circumference (r = 0.85, P = 0.016, n = 7).

D. Enette Larson-Meyer, et al. Diabetes Technol Ther. 2010 March;12(3):207-212.
2.
FIG. 1.

FIG. 1. From: Feasibility of Assessing Liver Lipid by Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy in Healthy Normal and Overweight Prepubertal Children.

(A) To assess IHL by 1H-MRS, a single water-suppressed PRESS voxel (3 × 3 × 3 cm3) was positioned in an area of the liver's middle right lobe that was free from heavy vascularization as determined from T1-weighted axial scout images (25 slices, 8 mm thick, 2 mm separation). Although IHL content is determined by analysis of the water-suppressed spectra, individuals with higher IHL content can be visibly noted by viewing the non–water-suppressed spectra, which are shown for (B) the child with the lowest IHL content (0.07% relative to the oil phantom signal) (subject 08) and (C) the child with the highest IHL content (3.2%) (subject 02). Note that the image in (A) has been transposed for display purposes. Frequency is presented in parts per million.

D. Enette Larson-Meyer, et al. Diabetes Technol Ther. 2010 March;12(3):207-212.

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