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Results: 5

1.
Figure 4

Figure 4. From: Sleep Behaviors and Sleep Quality in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders.

Data from 10 consecutive nights of actigraphy, obtained from an actigraph that was contained in a specially designed upper-sleeve pocket.

Margaret C. Souders, et al. Sleep. 2009 December 1;32(12):1566-1578.
2.
Figure 3

Figure 3. From: Sleep Behaviors and Sleep Quality in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders.

The sleep latency for all three subgroups was statistically different from the TD cohort (see P values at top), showing that children across the autism spectrum had difficulties falling asleep. The Asperger Disorder subgroup had the longest sleep latency 38.5 minutes.

Margaret C. Souders, et al. Sleep. 2009 December 1;32(12):1566-1578.
3.
Figure 5

Figure 5. From: Sleep Behaviors and Sleep Quality in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders.

The x axis shows the time of day, 1900 to 0700. The y axis is the average activity count per hour of the typically developing (TD) and autism spectrum disorder (ASD) cohorts. On average, the TD and ASD cohorts went to bed wearing the actigraph at 2115 and woke at 0705, as reported by parents on the sleep diary.

Margaret C. Souders, et al. Sleep. 2009 December 1;32(12):1566-1578.
4.
Figure 1

Figure 1. From: Sleep Behaviors and Sleep Quality in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders.

The Children's Sleep Habits Questionnaire (CSHQ) cutoff subscale total score is 41, shown as a bold line. Forty-five percent of the typically developing (TD) control subjects scored greater than 41 (mean score 41.7, SD 4.56). Most children scored at or just above the cutoff, illustrating that most sleep difficulties in the TD cohort are mild.

Margaret C. Souders, et al. Sleep. 2009 December 1;32(12):1566-1578.
5.
Figure 2

Figure 2. From: Sleep Behaviors and Sleep Quality in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders.

The Children's Sleep Habits Questionnaire (CSHQ) cutoff subscale total score is 41, shown as a bold line. In contrast to the typically developing children (data shown in Figure 1), 66.1% of the cohort with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) scored greater than the cutoff (mean score 47.39, SD of 8.21), representing more moderate to severe sleep problems.

Margaret C. Souders, et al. Sleep. 2009 December 1;32(12):1566-1578.

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