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Results: 3

1.
Figure 2

Figure 2. From: Resistance training among young athletes: safety, efficacy and injury prevention effects.

Estimated number of “weightlifting” (ie, resistance training) injuries presenting in US emergency rooms between the years 2002 and 2005. Reprinted from Myer et al.24 Reproduced by permission of the National Strength and Conditioning Association, Colorado Springs, Colorado, USA.

A D Faigenbaum, et al. Br J Sports Med. 2010 January;44(1):56-63.
2.
Figure 3

Figure 3. From: Resistance training among young athletes: safety, efficacy and injury prevention effects.

Percentage of injuries of the oldest and youngest age categories. Note that the small prevalence of leg injuries in the 8–13 years age categories provides invalidated results and should be interpreted with caution. Reprinted from Myer et al.24 Reproduced by permission of the National Strength and Conditioning Association, Colorado Springs, Colorado, USA.

A D Faigenbaum, et al. Br J Sports Med. 2010 January;44(1):56-63.
3.
Figure 1

Figure 1. From: Resistance training among young athletes: safety, efficacy and injury prevention effects.

Reported high school “weightlifting” (ie, resistance training) participants after the induction of Title IX (school years 1973–2005) based on the participation estimates from the High School Athletics Participation Survey conducted by the National Federation of State High School Associations. Reprinted from Quatman et al.1 Reproduced by permission of the National Strength and Conditioning Association, Colorado Springs, Colorado, USA.

A D Faigenbaum, et al. Br J Sports Med. 2010 January;44(1):56-63.

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